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  1. #1

    cramar's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 23, 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    93
    Specs:
    Black MacBook 2GB RAM, 22" Samsung WS monitor, Apple Bluetooth KB & Mighty Mouse, Airport Extreme BS
    How do I verify AirPort Extreme Settings?
    I am typing this out at the end of my yard on a MacBook. Cool!

    I have just setup the new AirPort Extreme Base Station, by following the instruction manual. Everything went smoothly and everything "just works!" (I'm probably 80' away.)

    I just did a speed test at http://www.speedtest.net/ and it said 6395 kb/s up and 485 down.

    My questions are:

    1) How do I know I am operating under 802.11n and not 802.11g? (i.e. How do I verify that my MB has been software enabled for n and the BS & MB are indeed running this?)

    2) The BS is suppose to run at either 2.4 Ghz or 5 Ghz. How do I determine what it is running and how do you switch frequencies if needed?

    3) Is channel selection automatic or can you manually change if needed?

    I cannot find any indication that says "You are running a 802.11n network at x Ghz." All I found is a channel indication (11 at the time).

  2. #2


    Member Since
    Oct 27, 2005
    Posts
    4,702
    Hi cramar,

    Your questions are very specific and although my knowledge of Airport Base Stations is zilch - I have had a good look around the web anyway.

    All I can offer you is this link. I hope you can find some information there.

  3. #3

    cramar's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 23, 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    93
    Specs:
    Black MacBook 2GB RAM, 22" Samsung WS monitor, Apple Bluetooth KB & Mighty Mouse, Airport Extreme BS
    Thanks, Pulse-8. The link has a few interesting bits of information. However, I am amazed at the lack of meaning information and status information available for the Mac and AirPort Extreme.

    I installed a new Widget called AirTrafficControl 2.0 beta and it has some useful information. Also I found an OS-X utiltiy on my system called "Internet Connect" which has an AirPort Signal Level indicator with 15 bars. This is the most useful information so far, but I want something smaller possibly on the Menu bar. The Mac AirPort indicator on the menu bar is next to useless. Did some intersting range tests with the signal level indicator, but will post on new thread.

    I still haven't found any indication that I have 802.11n speed enabled. What I want is some widget or indicator always running that tells the signal strength, speeds, freq., plus other information. Basically the current indicators tell me what I already know--that I am connected to my named network and it has WPA encryption.

    I think I will try the Apple support forums. I also want to know if you can control the broadcast signal strength.

  4. #4

    hotskate's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 08, 2006
    Location
    Arizona/ New York
    Posts
    470
    Specs:
    15 Macbook Pro, Core 2 Duo, 2.4GHz, 4GB, 160GB HD
    agreed but my problem is my light is flashing amber

  5. #5


    Member Since
    Oct 27, 2005
    Posts
    4,702
    Quote Originally Posted by cramar View Post
    I still haven't found any indication that I have 802.11n speed enabled.
    How to tell if 802.11n-enabling software is installed

    A reader tells me that a flap is being raised over Apple's newly released $1.99 802.11n Enabler for Core 2 Duo Macs. There's some wild nonsense flying around, so let's nail down the facts.
    You may not have an 802.11n-equipped Mac.
    Only Core 2 Duo MacBook, MacBook Pro, iMac (except 17-inch, 1.83 GHz) and Mac Pro (with the wireless option installed) support 802.11n in hardware. All other Intel Macs with Wi-Fi have 802.11a/b/g networking. PowerPC Macs have 802.11b/g.

    802.11n cannot be added to Macs that don't have it.
    Bummer. There's always USB and ExpressCard, so don't lose hope.

    If you buy a new AirPort Extreme, you get an unlimited site license for the 802.11n Mac client enabler for free.
    Contrary to other reports, the enabler that comes with the AirPort Extreme CD can be used on any number of Macs at the owner's site. The AirPort Extreme CD has a redistributable package containing the enabler. I did the full software install on the MacBook Pro and verified that it enabled 802.11n networking. I copied only the Enabler package file to a MacBook, installed it, and found that it had enabled 802.11n. I wasn't required to associate with the AirPort Extreme to get 802.11n going.

    If you don't have any draft 802.11n equipment now, keep your $1.99.
    The enabler adds absolutely nothing to a qualifying Mac other than to enable 802.11n. The enabler will not speed up or otherwise enhance 802.11a, b or g. I believe that 802.11n will be bundled with Leopard. Can you wait until June?

    After you run the enabler once, it sticks to your Mac forever.
    You will never have to buy the enabler again. Roam from one network to another network and your Mac's n-ness will remain. You can wipe your Mac clean and reinstall OS X from scratch, and your machine will remain n-enabled. If you replace your whole Mac, run the original enabler again on the new machine and you're covered.

    Apple is required to charge you for the enabler.
    802.11n was R & D intensive; it's not your granny's WiFi. You can't amortize R & D costs against new products--in this case, AirPort Extreme and Apple TV--and then give that same R & D away somewhere else. That would create what's called an accounting irregularity, and these aren't popular at places like Apple and Dell just now. The only way to put 802.11n into existing Mac users' hands was to turn it into a product against which R & D could be charged. $1.99 is a token, the very least that Apple could charge you and still call the enabler a product. If Apple hadn't come up with this sound solution, you'd have to buy AirPort Extreme--an extraordinary product, as you'll read in my review--or wait for Leopard in order to get 802.11n.

    Nobody can promise that the 802.11n draft will match the final specification. Chipmakers claim that they can adapt to changes in the spec with firmware updates. If no one else planned for that contingency, Apple did. It releases plenty of AirPort compatibility updates as it is. Apple's network team is on it.
    AirPort Extreme 802.11n* Enabler for Mac (*Based on an IEEE 802.11n draft specification.)

  6. #6

    Reel1's Avatar
    Member Since
    Nov 29, 2006
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    606
    Specs:
    2.16 GHz Intel Imac Core 2 Duo//MacBook 1.83 Core 2 Duo//G5 Power Mac
    I am not sure if this will help, but it will indicate if you have wireless "N" enabled.

    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPL...More=D4141ZM/A

  7. #7

    cramar's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 23, 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    93
    Specs:
    Black MacBook 2GB RAM, 22" Samsung WS monitor, Apple Bluetooth KB & Mighty Mouse, Airport Extreme BS
    Thank you, THANK YOU, Pulse-8! Perfect!! I checked and "n" is enabled!

    One more problem gone, more to go!

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