New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Internet, Networking, and Wireless Discussion of networking, internet, and wireless including Apple's Airport products.

Why do I have 2 different IP adresses?


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
kevinoh33

 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 18
kevinoh33 is on a distinguished road

kevinoh33 is offline
Why is it that when I connect my computer to my cable modem, my ip address is completely different than connecting my computer to my netgear wireless router? I checked both on What Is My IP Address? Lookup IP, Hide IP, Change IP, Trace IP and more... and they turned out to be different ip addresses. The ip address started with only 2 digits before the period (69.xxx.xx.xxx) does that have to do with anything?

Is there any way I can change the IP address when I'm connected to my netgear wireless router so that when I go on What Is My IP Address? Lookup IP, Hide IP, Change IP, Trace IP and more... it shows a different ip address?

EDIT:
When I first checked my ip address from the link above when I was connected to my router. It was (69.xxx.xx.xxx). Then when I plugged my computer to the cable modem the ip address was (173.x.xxx.xx). Then I connected back to the netgear router and I checked the IP address again and it was the same as before (69.xxx.xx.xxx). I tried turning off the modem and router on and off and nothing changed.
QUOTE Thanks
dtravis7

 
dtravis7's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 04, 2005
Location: Modesto, Ca.
Posts: 27,543
dtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: iMac 2.4 C2D 10.9.4, iMac 2.16 C2d 10.6.8, Macbook2007 10.8.4, Mac Mini 10.8.4, iPhone 3GS Note 8!!

dtravis7 is offline
You want your computers IP the same as the one From your cable provider? That would defeat the purpose of your router. Is the IP on your computer like 192.168.1.100 or something like that?

Maybe I am misunderstanding your question. A router is supposed to give you a private IP address for your home (LAN) Nertwork.
QUOTE Thanks
Raz0rEdge

 
Raz0rEdge's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 17, 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 7,433
Raz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant futureRaz0rEdge has a brilliant future
Mac Specs: 27" i7 iMac, 24" iMac, 13" Macbook Air, iPhone 5 & 5S, iPod Nano 7th Gen, iPad 2 16GB WiFi, iPad 3

Raz0rEdge is offline
You have one public IP address assigned to your cable modem by your ISP and you have a second private IP address handed out by your router or your cable modem..unless you specifically configured the router and cable modem to use the same range, they will differ..

But seeing address like 192.168.xxx.xxx, 172.10.xxx.xxx are all private Class C IP addresses..

These things don't matter since when you're on the Internet, you only use the public IP address..the private IP addresses are not accessible from the Internet..

--
Regards
...Ashwin



Be sure to read the Community Guidelines | The more information you provide, the better answers you get, remember GIGO.
QUOTE Thanks
osxx

 
osxx's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 19, 2008
Location: houston texas
Posts: 4,638
osxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to all
Mac Specs: 09 MBP 8GB ram 500GB HD OS 10.9 32B iPad 4 32GB iPhone 5 iOs7 2TB TC Apple TV3

osxx is offline
Each computer in your network will have the same WAN IP but have different LAN IP for
wired and wireless.
QUOTE Thanks
kevinoh33

 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 18
kevinoh33 is on a distinguished road

kevinoh33 is offline
When I first checked my ip address from the link above when I was connected to my router. It was (69.xxx.xx.xxx). Then when I plugged my computer to the cable modem the ip address was (173.x.xxx.xx). Then I connected back to the netgear router and I checked the IP address again and it was the same as before (69.xxx.xx.xxx). I tried turning off the modem and router on and off and nothing changed.

None of the ip checking websites I've visited detected a 192. or a 172. ip address. I just need to change the 69.xxx.xx.xxx ip address. Is there any way I can do that?
QUOTE Thanks
dtravis7

 
dtravis7's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 04, 2005
Location: Modesto, Ca.
Posts: 27,543
dtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond reputedtravis7 has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: iMac 2.4 C2D 10.9.4, iMac 2.16 C2d 10.6.8, Macbook2007 10.8.4, Mac Mini 10.8.4, iPhone 3GS Note 8!!

dtravis7 is offline
That 69.x.x.x is being handEd out by your ISP. There is no way to change that from your end.

Why are you trying to a change your ip address? Trying to spoof a site with a different IP address?
QUOTE Thanks
kevinoh33

 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 18
kevinoh33 is on a distinguished road

kevinoh33 is offline
I am not trying to "spoof" and website. I am simply trying change my ip address for personal reasons.

Either way, I still don't understand why I have 2 different ip addresses (when I'm connected directly to the cable modem and when I'm connected to the router.)
QUOTE Thanks
osxx

 
osxx's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 19, 2008
Location: houston texas
Posts: 4,638
osxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to all
Mac Specs: 09 MBP 8GB ram 500GB HD OS 10.9 32B iPad 4 32GB iPhone 5 iOs7 2TB TC Apple TV3

osxx is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinoh33 View Post
I am not trying to "spoof" and website. I am simply trying change my ip address for personal reasons.

Either way, I still don't understand why I have 2 different ip addresses (when I'm connected directly to the cable modem and when I'm connected to the router.)
All routers that I have ever used or hooked up have always handed out a different ip for wireless versus wired on the same computer and it maybe do to the fact wired is 802.3 and wireless is 802.11 someone with more knowledge may have a better answer.
QUOTE Thanks
baggss

 
baggss's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 10, 2004
Location: Margaritaville
Posts: 10,309
baggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 27" 3.4 Ghz i7 iMac-13" C2D Macbook-OSX 18.8.2-64Gb iPad 2-32 Gb iPhone 5-ATV 2-14Tb of Storage

baggss is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by osxx View Post
All routers that I have ever used or hooked up have always handed out a different ip for wireless versus wired on the same computer and it maybe do to the fact wired is 802.3 and wireless is 802.11 someone with more knowledge may have a better answer.
Agreed. Go to any hotel that has wired and wireless and swap between the two, you'll see different IP ranges.

For the OP: The wireless router is assigning a PRIVATE address to your computer as it is supposed to do. Your router uses the actual PUBLIC IP from your ISP and shares access among various devices you may allow on the network, hence the different IP adress. When you hook up to the modem directly your computer now uses the PUBLIC IP provide by your ISP and no other devices can share the network, unless your ISP allows you to have multiple PUBLIC IPs. You can have some sort of sharing enabled from the computer itself, in which case the computer will act as a router and assign PRIVATE IPs to other devices.

There are dedicated PRIVATE Network IP ranges that are standard for all routers / private shared networks. They are:

10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255

172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255

192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

Your router should allow the option to choose between any of those 3 blocks and may allow you to dedicate specific IPs within those block to specific devices on your network. In my case, on my home network, I have chosen to use the 10.x block and have set my router to allocate IPs from 10.0.0.2 to 10.0.0.200 for all my devices that connect to my router (both wirelessly and wired) but my actual ISP allocated PUBLIC IP is used by my router to access the internet.

You can only choose between those 3 block of PRIVATE IPs for devices that connect to your router, there are no further options. If you wish to change your PUBLIC IP address you need to contact your ISP and see what they can do.


QUOTE Thanks
kevinoh33

 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 18
kevinoh33 is on a distinguished road

kevinoh33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by baggss View Post
Agreed. Go to any hotel that has wired and wireless and swap between the two, you'll see different IP ranges.

For the OP: The wireless router is assigning a PRIVATE address to your computer as it is supposed to do. Your router uses the actual PUBLIC IP from your ISP and shares access among various devices you may allow on the network, hence the different IP adress. When you hook up to the modem directly your computer now uses the PUBLIC IP provide by your ISP and no other devices can share the network, unless your ISP allows you to have multiple PUBLIC IPs. You can have some sort of sharing enabled from the computer itself, in which case the computer will act as a router and assign PRIVATE IPs to other devices.

There are dedicated PRIVATE Network IP ranges that are standard for all routers / private shared networks. They are:

10.0.0.0 10.255.255.255

172.16.0.0 172.31.255.255

192.168.0.0 192.168.255.255

Private network - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Your router should allow the option to choose between any of those 3 blocks and may allow you to dedicate specific IPs within those block to specific devices on your network. In my case, on my home network, I have chosen to use the 10.x block and have set my router to allocate IPs from 10.0.0.2 to 10.0.0.200 for all my devices that connect to my router (both wirelessly and wired) but my actual ISP allocated PUBLIC IP is used by my router to access the internet.

You can only choose between those 3 block of PRIVATE IPs for devices that connect to your router, there are no further options. If you wish to change your PUBLIC IP address you need to contact your ISP and see what they can do.
Are you sure my wireless router is assigning a private ip to my macbook? Because when I check my ip address on What Is My IP Address? Lookup IP, Hide IP, Change IP, Trace IP and more... , it gives me an ip address that starts with a 69. not a 10. 172. or 192.
QUOTE Thanks
osxx

 
osxx's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 19, 2008
Location: houston texas
Posts: 4,638
osxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to allosxx is a name known to all
Mac Specs: 09 MBP 8GB ram 500GB HD OS 10.9 32B iPad 4 32GB iPhone 5 iOs7 2TB TC Apple TV3

osxx is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinoh33 View Post
Are you sure my wireless router is assigning a private ip to my macbook? Because when I check my ip address on What Is My IP Address? Lookup IP, Hide IP, Change IP, Trace IP and more... , it gives me an ip address that starts with a 69. not a 10. 172. or 192.
Ok to clear it up your actual IP that the outside world connects to you could start with 69. xxx.xxx.xx.
The router/modem could have an IP of 192.xxx.x.xxx
The computer could have 192.xxx.x.xx
The point is every piece in your system that communicates with the net or
your local net has an address that you can change within certain parameters with a static ip.
The actual ip that the provider gave you 69.xxx.xxx.xx can only be altered by them.
QUOTE Thanks
baggss

 
baggss's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 10, 2004
Location: Margaritaville
Posts: 10,309
baggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 27" 3.4 Ghz i7 iMac-13" C2D Macbook-OSX 18.8.2-64Gb iPad 2-32 Gb iPhone 5-ATV 2-14Tb of Storage

baggss is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinoh33 View Post
Are you sure my wireless router is assigning a private ip to my macbook? Because when I check my ip address on What Is My IP Address? Lookup IP, Hide IP, Change IP, Trace IP and more... , it gives me an ip address that starts with a 69. not a 10. 172. or 192.
Yes, I am. Did you not understand the PUBIC vs PRIVATE IP concept? The outside world will see that IP for ANY device that connects to your network because its the PUBLIC IP, the PRIVATE IPs are for internal network use only and NEVER get sent over the web. EVER


QUOTE Thanks
BrianLachoreVPI

 
BrianLachoreVPI's Avatar
 
Member Since: Feb 24, 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,742
BrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant futureBrianLachoreVPI has a brilliant future
Mac Specs: March 2011 15" MBP 2.3GHz i7 Quad Core 8GB Ram | Mid 2011 27" iMac 3.4 GHz i7 16 GB RAM 2 TB HDD

BrianLachoreVPI is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by osxx View Post
All routers that I have ever used or hooked up have always handed out a different ip for wireless versus wired on the same computer and it maybe do to the fact wired is 802.3 and wireless is 802.11 someone with more knowledge may have a better answer.
The Ethernet chipset and 802.11 chipsets each have their own unique MAC addresses.
QUOTE Thanks
EvenStranger

 
EvenStranger's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 09, 2010
Location: Virginia
Posts: 845
EvenStranger is just really niceEvenStranger is just really niceEvenStranger is just really niceEvenStranger is just really niceEvenStranger is just really nice
Mac Specs: Currently 13" Late 2010 MBA, 4GB/128GB; Early 2011 13" MBP, dual core i7 2.7ghz, 4gb ram, 500gb hd

EvenStranger is offline
Last paragraph has the questions if you want to skip ahead.

There are number of concepts here that need to be addressed. First, IP addresses are kind of like phone numbers - moving from broader information to more specific information. Your phone number would start with a country code, in the US that's 1+, then area code, denoting a large region within a state usually, then local code specifying your neighborhood or community, and then exchange, or your phone. Same with IPs. IP addresses are divided into four sets of numbers, or octets (based on 8 binary digits from 00000000 to 11111111, or 0 to 255). Your first octet is the broadest scope. It can literally cover millions of websites and individual internet accounts. Then it proceeds to narrow down through the second and third octets to finally end at the fourth octet, your network's IP. If every possible numeric combination was assigned to a computer, our current IP setup could handle about 4.2 billion (255^4) connections. However, large blocks are set aside for government use, education, different countries, or just overhead.

Several large blocks are set aside also for private use. IPs beginning with 10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x and 192.168.x.x are used by routers to map an internal network without requiring multiple public IP addresses. Think of a switchboard at any company - they have one public phone number, but once the call reaches the switchboard, it can be passed to an extension within the company. Your router is doing the same thing.

Now, as to why you are receiving two different public IP addresses on two different connections to supposedly the same network, I don't know... If it's the same network, both devices should be showing the same public IP addresses, just like two phones in the same company would be accessible through the same main number. I'm wondering if you are certain you're connecting to the correct wireless network. Netgears are pretty prolific, and if you're using the generic Netgear name as your wireless network, it's easy to get it mixed up with someone else's network. Is there a VPN connection going on somewhere? Proxy software that routes your computer through a remote host? Do other computers behave the same way - a 69.0.0.0 wired and a 173.0.0.0 over wireless? If not, then you know it's a setting on your computer somewhere.

I hope this helps... let us know what you find out.
QUOTE Thanks
kevinoh33

 
Member Since: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 18
kevinoh33 is on a distinguished road

kevinoh33 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvenStranger View Post
Last paragraph has the questions if you want to skip ahead.

There are number of concepts here that need to be addressed. First, IP addresses are kind of like phone numbers - moving from broader information to more specific information. Your phone number would start with a country code, in the US that's 1+, then area code, denoting a large region within a state usually, then local code specifying your neighborhood or community, and then exchange, or your phone. Same with IPs. IP addresses are divided into four sets of numbers, or octets (based on 8 binary digits from 00000000 to 11111111, or 0 to 255). Your first octet is the broadest scope. It can literally cover millions of websites and individual internet accounts. Then it proceeds to narrow down through the second and third octets to finally end at the fourth octet, your network's IP. If every possible numeric combination was assigned to a computer, our current IP setup could handle about 4.2 billion (255^4) connections. However, large blocks are set aside for government use, education, different countries, or just overhead.

Several large blocks are set aside also for private use. IPs beginning with 10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x and 192.168.x.x are used by routers to map an internal network without requiring multiple public IP addresses. Think of a switchboard at any company - they have one public phone number, but once the call reaches the switchboard, it can be passed to an extension within the company. Your router is doing the same thing.

Now, as to why you are receiving two different public IP addresses on two different connections to supposedly the same network, I don't know... If it's the same network, both devices should be showing the same public IP addresses, just like two phones in the same company would be accessible through the same main number. I'm wondering if you are certain you're connecting to the correct wireless network. Netgears are pretty prolific, and if you're using the generic Netgear name as your wireless network, it's easy to get it mixed up with someone else's network. Is there a VPN connection going on somewhere? Proxy software that routes your computer through a remote host? Do other computers behave the same way - a 69.0.0.0 wired and a 173.0.0.0 over wireless? If not, then you know it's a setting on your computer somewhere.

I hope this helps... let us know what you find out.
I renamed the default name "NETGEAR" to my first name so I wouldn't get confused with others. There's not VPN connection or proxy softwares. I also have a desktop computer that uses a Belkin wireless adaptor to recieve wifi from my router and it also as the same IP Address (69.xxx.xx.xxx) as my Macbook Pro. So maybe I'm thinking, if I change the router, will it give me a new IP Address?
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« Airport Extreme -> Airport Express via Cat6 not working? | Can't Connect to Internet »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
resolving web adresses Pabs Internet, Networking, and Wireless 5 08-27-2010 10:11 PM
Entourage 2008 - Lost my adresses and emails bellastrada OS X - Apps and Games 1 07-25-2009 01:11 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:09 PM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?