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Images, Graphic Design, and Digital Photography Discussion of all things graphics.

help with my photography


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TattooedMac

 
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Yes you are correct. My bad, I miss read the page I was looking at. So easy to miss the letter 'r' when your not looking for it.

All you need to do is search for Wireless Flash Trigger Remote like this one here that fits the 3200 but not with the SB-200. There are compatible ones out there you just need to look.
I think this is your best bet, unless you have something to light the Muslin up.

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TattooedMac

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chas_m View Post
The poor-but-not-especially-lazy man's way:

Mask off the subject by using the color matching feature in Photoshop, .......
I wouldn't call Photoshop, the poor mans + its not really a natural feel to it either . . . . But yes it works.

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conamor

 
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I just notice the new version is a subscription :/
That makes it expensive when you want to use it 10 times a year
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DougStocks

 
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White Balance has been mentioned a few times. Keep in mind that except for ISO, focus, shutter speed & aperture, none of the in-camera adjustments have any effect if you are shooting in RAW.
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conamor

 
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I take the pictures in JPEG and RAW. So if I understand, the raw file doesn't have the white balance setting that was chosen on the camera, correct? Then I can take the raw file and ajust the WB with the software Aperture?
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That is correct. Many people including myself always capture in both jpeg and RAW. the jpeg is a great convenience in that it gives you have an image that is often as good as you need for either proofs or posting on the web. But if you're producing fine art prints, then I think you will want the added control over your images that RAW provides.

Incidentally, even though Adobe seems to want to price Photoshop beyond the means of all but professional photogs; Photoshop Elements is a very powerful PP tool sufficient for most purposes and cost under $100.
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Old Rogue

 
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Try using the black muslin.
White makes a poor background, since it's used mostly for reflecting or diffusing light.
Darker backgrounds cause your subject to 'pop.'

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TattooedMac

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStocks View Post
Incidentally, even though Adobe seems to want to price Photoshop beyond the means of all but professional photogs;
You have 2 days left to get the Photographers Deal of $9.99/Mth for Photoshop CC + LR and every update they put out while you are in the subscription.

Photoshop Photography Program

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BCRose

 
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Just wanted to clear up some misconceptions noted in some of the answers.

Believe it or not the shutter speed does not really matter when using flash. The flash freezes the subject so 1/60th, I/125 or even 1/15 shutter speeds will make no difference, just stay below your cameras flash sync speed. The shutter speed will only affect the ambient light or background exposure, your subject is 'frozen' by the flash duration time which is really fast...like 1/1000 of a second or higher. A tripod will not help. If you cannot hold the camera steady enough for flash photography then you have other issues. A tripod is useful for keeping the camera in the exact same position in regards to the lighting setup.

Remember, shutter speed controls how long the subject is exposed to light (time) and Aperture controls the volume of light the subject receives in that amount of time.

To increase the volume of light you can either move the light source closer to the subject (inverse square rule) or increase the power of the the light. You can also open the aperture of the lens to a wider setting, keeping in mind that this controls your depth of field as well.

Only use M mode when shooting in a controlled environment. You want to control the exposure, not have the camera control anything. In the automatic modes like A or S you will never get a consistent shot as the camera can change settings for you depending on what it meters each shot.

Attempting studio type shots with a single weak flash is difficult, it can be done but you will probably need to modify the type of shot you want. Forget about lighting the white background. When you see the professionally done headshots like this they are probably using 4 or 5 very powerful lights including a couple of background lights, hair light etc.

What I would suggest in this case is to use modifiers, reflectors, umbrellas etc. any white surface works well and try to redirect the light onto your subject, put the reflectors very close to the subject just out of the frame and experiment. There are many tutorials online to give you detailed instructions on how to shoot portraits with a single speedlight. You really need to get it off the camera to be honest.

Check this website I just Googled...

How to Create Multiple Portrait Styles with One Speedlight PictureCorrect

Cheers,
BCRose
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BCRose

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conamor View Post
Hi everyone,

I have attached the details of the picture.

The picture is too big to be uploaded, 10MB and 6****x resolution...

I am using the P option on the camera.
18-55 lens
I was at about 6 feet from the subject.

-- oh, and if I can ask another question; The muslin backdrop I bought doesn't come out as pure white and there are wrinkles of course. What would be the best way to put the background completely white? Photoshop and lasso tool? I thought that with the muslin I would have less editing to do.
To make the background the way you want it simply move the subject at least 6 feet away from the background and use a wider aperture to decrease the depth of field. Putting the subject 6 or 8 feet in front of the background and using f/5/6 or f/4 for example will completely blur the background and eliminate any wrinkles etc.

Cheers,
BCRose
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RavingMac

 
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I wouldn't disagree in principle on the impact of flash vs shutter speed. However, attempting to use a small flash in bounce I'm not so sure you can rely upon it alone to "freeze" the subject, especially with significant ambient light.

Regardless, it is hard to see why using a tripod would detract since the OP isn't having to carry it over hill and dale to shoot.

I've always wanted to be smart, handsome and modest. But, I guess I'll have to be satisfied with two out of three . . .
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BCRose

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RavingMac View Post
I wouldn't disagree in principle on the impact of flash vs shutter speed. However, attempting to use a small flash in bounce I'm not so sure you can rely upon it alone to "freeze" the subject, especially with significant ambient light.

Regardless, it is hard to see why using a tripod would detract since the OP isn't having to carry it over hill and dale to shoot.
Well then you do not understand the principle of flash duration because the duration of the flash is even shorter at lower power settings. This is what freezes the subject, not the shutter speed.

Try this if you need proof: Setup in studio setting for a portrait using flash. Use M mode and set your shutter speed to 1/15 second. Take a frame. Now change the shutter speed to 1/125 and compare. They will be identical in exposure and subject will be sharp.

If you are not using flash then of course the shutter speed is important.

You also misunderstood what I intended regarding a tripod. I meant that it would not 'help' to freeze the subject as was indicated in some of the answers. It will be of benefit to keep the camera secured in a position you want to frame the subject and keep the exposures constant in regards to lighting.

Cheers,
BCRose
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DougStocks

 
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Very thorough discussion given by BCRose. However, I differ with him/her on one aspect. Shutter speed can matter when using flash simply because the duration of the flash is so short. At the 1/15 second duration mentioned or slower, then, depending upon the amount of ambient light, you can get noticeable ghosting (unless the subject is inanimate and the camera is on a tripod). A living subject will almost certainly move some as will a hand held camera. Also, as previously pointed out, a shutter speed in excess of the camera's sync speed might produce an unevenly illuminated frame.

As an interesting test of how stead you can hold a camera, take two laser pointers. Place one on a table shinning on a wall. While holding the second one, try to keep your dot on the one generated by the table's.
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RavingMac

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCRose View Post
Well then you do not understand the principle of flash duration because the duration of the flash is even shorter at lower power settings. This is what freezes the subject, not the shutter speed.

Try this if you need proof: Setup in studio setting for a portrait using flash. Use M mode and set your shutter speed to 1/15 second. Take a frame. Now change the shutter speed to 1/125 and compare. They will be identical in exposure and subject will be sharp.

If you are not using flash then of course the shutter speed is important.

You also misunderstood what I intended regarding a tripod. I meant that it would not 'help' to freeze the subject as was indicated in some of the answers. It will be of benefit to keep the camera secured in a position you want to frame the subject and keep the exposures constant in regards to lighting.
I do understand. Doug says it better, below, than I did.
In essence, what you are saying is correct only when flash provides the majority of light for the total exposure. When ambient light is significant, shutter speed matters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStocks View Post
Very thorough discussion given by BCRose. However, I differ with him/her on one aspect. Shutter speed can matter when using flash simply because the duration of the flash is so short. At the 1/15 second duration mentioned or slower, then, depending upon the amount of ambient light, you can get noticeable ghosting (unless the subject is inanimate and the camera is on a tripod). A living subject will almost certainly move some as will a hand held camera. Also, as previously pointed out, a shutter speed in excess of the camera's sync speed might produce an unevenly illuminated frame.

As an interesting test of how stead you can hold a camera, take two laser pointers. Place one on a table shinning on a wall. While holding the second one, try to keep your dot on the one generated by the table's.

I've always wanted to be smart, handsome and modest. But, I guess I'll have to be satisfied with two out of three . . .
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BCRose

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStocks View Post
Very thorough discussion given by BCRose. However, I differ with him/her on one aspect. Shutter speed can matter when using flash simply because the duration of the flash is so short. At the 1/15 second duration mentioned or slower, then, depending upon the amount of ambient light, you can get noticeable ghosting (unless the subject is inanimate and the camera is on a tripod). A living subject will almost certainly move some as will a hand held camera. Also, as previously pointed out, a shutter speed in excess of the camera's sync speed might produce an unevenly illuminated frame.

As an interesting test of how stead you can hold a camera, take two laser pointers. Place one on a table shinning on a wall. While holding the second one, try to keep your dot on the one generated by the table's.
Like the original poster was asking about...Flash in a studio setting providing 100% of light.
The information regarding ambient light is not relevant here. There will not be ghosting with a stationary posed subject like this. You are talking about something completely different where you expose for the ambient light and freeze the subject with flash, for that you need at least 1/30 ss in my experience for good results.

In a studio situation like the original poster was asking about my information is totally relevant. I urge you to try it to see for yourself. Speculating on what might or should happen is not really helpful to the OP. This is a simple concept and all the misinformation given is only confusing what the OP asked.

Trust me on this...I am a retired school photographer and former studio owner and have shot hundreds of thousands of these types of headshots with great success. Like I mentioned above, doing this with a single speedlight is not easy but can be done with nice results.

Cheers,
BCRose
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