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  1. #1

    BlueMac's Avatar
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    I want buy a lens: A guide to what to look for when purchasing a new lens.
    So you want to buy a new lens? Read on to find out what factors you should look for when making a photographic lens decision. I will not recommend any brands, or certain models, because I am not a salesman. So here are the two major lens types: Autofocus, and manual focus. Autofocus lenses does not mean that you can only use autofocus; you can autofocus or manually control the focus. Meanwhile, with a manual focus lens, you may only manually control the focus. Autofocus lenses have another subcategory: Autofocus equipped, which means it has an autofocus motor built in to the lens. These are usually quite expensive. You wouldn't want to bother spending the money on this lens if you have a camera that has a built in autofocus motor, unless the specific lens has some other feature you think you might need. The other type of AF (autofocus) lens is one without a built in motor. Instead, it just has AF contacts and couplings- which allows the camera's built in motor to focus the lens. Hence, if you have a camera that does not have a built in motor (like the D40, or D40x) and you get a lens without a motor, you will only be able to manually focus. This may be a bother for people with a camera without a built in motor, especially if you plan to shoot things like sports, or moving objects, since you will have to manually focus with your subjects every move.
    Sorry, not much to say about manual focus lenses. I personally use one, and it's my only lens. Most manual focus lenses in the consumer grade market have been discontinued- but if you really wanted one, you might be able to find one used somewhere.

    Now, here are some factors to look at:

    Aperture range

    Focal length

    Sharpness

    read reviews! you might find them useful. Also, stay away from third party lenses such as anything Tamron, Quantaray, or Sunex. Again, I am not the salesman, so I cant say alot.



    I hope this helped you.
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  2. #2


    Member Since
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    thanks. Although it was quite basic.

  3. #3

    Phototini's Avatar
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    Really only very little of that comes into play when choosing a new lens. You should buy a lens that will serve it's purpose for what you plan on using it for.

    The number one rule of thumb when it comes to lens' is don't skimp on your glass. Buy the best you can afford, and keep in mind if it is to be used on a cropped sensor body or a full frame body (for those of you who are digital shooters). If you plan on upgrading from a cropped sensor body to a full frame body don't buy a crop sensor lens' as you wont be able to take full advantage of that new full body sensor on your new camera.

  4. #4

    Village Idiot's Avatar
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    Sorry dude. Get some experience, come back, then tell me why I don't need to spend $3000 on a Canon 16-35 f/2.8L USM and a Canon 80MM f/1.2L USM.
    Chaotic Evil, Level 1 IT-Tech

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  5. #5


    Member Since
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    Quote Originally Posted by Village Idiot View Post
    Sorry dude. Get some experience, come back, then tell me why I don't need to spend $3000 on a Canon 16-35 f/2.8L USM and a Canon 80MM f/1.2L USM.
    You better add 5mm on that 80mm or you might come up a little short. (:

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMac View Post
    Also, stay away from third party lenses such as anything Tamron, Quantaray, or Sunex. Again, I am not the salesman, so I cant say alot.
    Tamron makes some fine lenses. The 90mm macro, the 17-50, and the 28-75 are a few I've tried and can wholeheartedly recommend.
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  6. #6

    Village Idiot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikonjin View Post
    You better add 5mm on that 80mm or you might come up a little short. (:



    Tamron makes some fine lenses. The 90mm macro, the 17-50, and the 28-75 are a few I've tried and can wholeheartedly recommend.
    It's custom made.
    Chaotic Evil, Level 1 IT-Tech

    Slough Roast Blog
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