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  1. #1

    RiDE's Avatar
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    Hi-Res for Advertising purposes ???
    What specs does an image have to have in order to be considered "Hi-Res" for advertising purposes?

    Will most "point and shoot" digital cameras take "Hi-Res" pictures?

    Thanks!!!!!!

  2. #2

    AConfire's Avatar
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    It depends where you want to advertise..

    On the internet, Hi-Res means 72dpi.

    Why? Because computer monitors can only see 72 dots per inch.

    For flyers and print work, I recommend a minimum of 240dpi. At least 300dpi.

    Your camera will most likely shoot around 72-200ish dpi, but if you open it in a photo editing software, you could crop it with 300dpi and wala!

    Hi res just means higher resolution which is better quality when printing.

    Higher number dots per inch (dpi) mean bigger image and better quality. But remember, for internet purposes, you only need 72dpi.

    Look in your camera menu's, and make sure you are shooting with maximum megapixels and maximum quality (image quality).

    Best,
    -AC


    View my photography blog Here!

  3. #3

    EGGO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiDE View Post
    What specs does an image have to have in order to be considered "Hi-Res" for advertising purposes?

    Will most "point and shoot" digital cameras take "Hi-Res" pictures?

    Thanks!!!!!!
    Maybe after you resize to a higher dpi, otherwise, I haven't met one that ever did.

    The Visual Portfolio
    I hate mac zealots as much as windows/other OS zealots.

  4. #4

    bryphotoguy's Avatar
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    When it comes to a point and shoot, resolution (in my opinion) is more dependent on the lens. 5-10 megapixels can be a lot to work with depending on the medium you use for output. But if there is a plastic lens in between the sensor and subject, no amount of pixels will be any good.
    If you're doing something visual, you need something appealing and it needs to look professional. Don't skimp on the camera.

    January 2008 Member of the Month

  5. #5

    RiDE's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info... It's not for me.. I have a customer who is advertising (Print) a product I have sold them... He requested a "Hi-Res" image.. usually when I get this request, I just send actual samples to their Advert. Dept.... I was curious as to what exactly they were needing.... thanks for all of your help!

  6. #6

    DarkKnight369's Avatar
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    Hi Res is print quality, which is understood to be about 300dpi.

    Lo Res is web quality, which is 72dpi.

    If they are requesting hi res its for either print, or they want more more of the image to work with.

  7. #7

    Alexis's Avatar
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    Hi res for print is 300 dots per inch.

    Cameras take photos at 72dpi and need converting to 300dpi.

    A 6 megapixel image is 2848 x 2136 pixels at 72dpi (or 100cm x 75cm)

    Converted to high res 300dpi the image is 24 x 18cm.

    So a 6 megapixel camera will print just smaller than A4 at high res. You could easily up it to spot on A4 with no obvious reduction in quality though.

    Massive billboards are often 100 or 150dpi and massively increased in size, so they have huge dots close up. As they are looked at from a distance it doesn't matter that they're not high res though.

  8. #8

    DarkKnight369's Avatar
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    Yeah, everything he said is right. All you need to know though is high res usually means 300dpi, but if its off a digital camera, you can just give them the original file and it would work too.

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