Mac Forums

Mac Forums (http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/)
-   Apple Rumors and Reports (http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/apple-rumors-reports/)
-   -   Angry Apple makes hollow threat to bar Kindle, other ebook apps... (http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/apple-rumors-reports/301911-angry-apple-makes-hollow-threat-bar-kindle-other-ebook-apps.html)

TattooedMac 08-05-2013 08:41 PM

Angry Apple makes hollow threat to bar Kindle, other ebook apps...
 
This is well worth the read . . . .

Angry Apple makes hollow threat to bar Kindle, other ebook apps.


Quote:

xAt the time, then-CEO Steve Jobs put it plainly: “Our philosophy is simple – when Apple brings a new subscriber to the app, Apple earns a 30 percent share,” he said in a February 2011 statement. “When the publisher brings an existing or new subscriber to the app, the publisher keeps 100 percent and Apple earns nothing.”

RONE 08-05-2013 09:18 PM

Very interesting article. Personally, I side with Apple on this.

Quote:

Apple is under no duty to allow other retailers to offer apps on the iPad in the first place, much less on terms that subsidise their operations

Lifeisabeach 08-06-2013 12:03 AM

I'm completely against them on it. Why do they demand a royalty for ebooks and not other goods? Why should they be entitled to a 30% cut? They aren't hosting the content. They aren't processing the payment. And with their collusion with the publishers to switch everyone to the "agency" model, in combination with their "most favored nation" clause, demanding 30% of someone else's sales would mean zero profit margin for the others. Their "philosophy" is overly simplistic and quite frankly abusive. If they really want to kick Kindle and other ereader apps off, that would be a very hostile move and unfriendly to their customers, many who bought an iPad so they can enjoy content from a variety of sources.

bumbleboo 08-06-2013 04:52 AM

Instead of being faced by bully boy tactics I bought a Nexus Android with a Kindle App, no problem! However Google could start getting heavy handed with Amazon!!!! I think all these companies are getting too big for their boots, remember what happened to Ma Bell ?

bobtomay 08-06-2013 06:40 AM

Agree with lifeisabeach. Such a decision would only serve to cement my decision to stay with a Kindle or Android tablet. It would push me toward an Android phone in lieu of iOS and possibly back to Windows (or give Linux another go) with my next computer purchase.

If Microsoft had hatched a plan with the introduction of Win 3.1 or Win95 that afforded them a 30% cut of everything that could be sold to work and run in Windows, MS would not exist today.

This feeling that they deserve a 30% cut of everyone else's work because they created the operating system is, as far as I am concerned, the height of greed.

RONE 08-06-2013 12:56 PM

So much for letting the market decide what it will bear. Why does everyone feel the government needs to regulate the private sector economy? What happened to a free market?

RavingMac 08-06-2013 01:43 PM

As I am heavily invested in Amazon media (mostly Kindle eBooks) any move to prevent me accessing it on my iPad would cause me to exercise my free-market choice to switch to another platform.

chscag 08-06-2013 01:50 PM

Quote:

remember what happened to Ma Bell ?
LOL, they're alive and well.... Ever hear of AT&T? The new but old AT&T! ;)

MacInWin 08-06-2013 08:42 PM

No, AT&T is not Ma Bell. Ma Bell took care of everything from the user's hand to the user's hand on the other end...house wiring, local service, long distance, etc, etc. AT&T of today isn't that end-to-end.

vansmith 08-06-2013 08:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530536)
Why does everyone feel the government needs to regulate the private sector economy?

This alone is a good reason. Beyond that, if the government didn't regulate the economy, low paying jobs would see salaries plummet since there would be no reason to pay workers at a minimum rate (lacking skills, many of these people wouldn't be marketable). ;)
Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530536)
What happened to a free market?

Never left. The economy has never been free from regulation.

chscag 08-06-2013 10:05 PM

Quote:

AT&T of today isn't that end-to-end.
Yeah, I know, but the way AT&T customer service acts sometimes reminds of the old AT&T....

Lifeisabeach 08-07-2013 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530536)
So much for letting the market decide what it will bear. Why does everyone feel the government needs to regulate the private sector economy? What happened to a free market?

LOL! How naive. Have you missed the fact that Apple colluded with publishers to fix prices and harm the competition by denying them the opportunity to compete on price? Left unchecked, the "haves" will abuse the "free" market. Here's a great example in the news right now:
McDonalds’ suggested budget for employees shows just how impossible it is to get by on minimum wage | Death and Taxes

In the "free" market, there'd be no minimum wage. And I GUARANTEE YOU low income workers would be making even less. Look at that comedy of a "budget" McDonalds has laid out for their workers. There is no way to make ends meet. None. Which means government assistance is required for these people to survive. How do you like the notion that your goods and services are subsidized by your tax dollars because the workers bringing them can't survive on what they make? It'd be even worse if they made $3/hour in the "free" market.

dtravis7 08-07-2013 02:26 AM

AT&T What? Customer service? hahahahahaha. Are you kidding! :D Many times now I had to do their troubleshooting for them!

My issue with going back to windows is and I don't care what anyone says, Windows 8 is not a good desktop OS. But 8.1 has a Start menu! Does it? I have 8.1. It brings up Metro. That is not the Start menu. People are mad.

I need adobe. The Gimp for me is not even close so Linux is out for my overall use. I could use it for the internet though.

Apple is getting greedy for sure and going a different way lately than they should have gone. Not sure what to do if this continues which have a feeling it will.

RONE 08-07-2013 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vansmith (Post 1530607)
This alone is a good reason. Beyond that, if the government didn't regulate the economy, low paying jobs would see salaries plummet since there would be no reason to pay workers at a minimum rate (lacking skills, many of these people wouldn't be marketable). ;)

I would say that The Great Recession actually supports my argument, not yours. The government has been heavily regulating things since long before this most recent recession, yet it still happened. So, how's that regulation going for us? Really well, by the looks of things.
Quote:

Originally Posted by lifeisabeach (Post 1530638)
LOL! How naive. Have you missed the fact that Apple colluded with publishers to fix prices and harm the competition by denying them the opportunity to compete on price? Left unchecked, the "haves" will abuse the "free" market. Here's a great example in the news right now:
McDonalds’ suggested budget for employees shows just how impossible it is to get by on minimum wage | Death and Taxes

In the "free" market, there'd be no minimum wage. And I GUARANTEE YOU low income workers would be making even less. Look at that comedy of a "budget" McDonalds has laid out for their workers. There is no way to make ends meet. None. Which means government assistance is required for these people to survive. How do you like the notion that your goods and services are subsidized by your tax dollars because the workers bringing them can't survive on what they make? It'd be even worse if they made $3/hour in the "free" market.

Yes, Apple colluded with publishers to raise eBook prices. But do you understand why they did it? It was because Amazon was selling books at a loss to stifle competition. So don't go saying that Apple was harming competition! I would say without a second thought that there is more competition in the eBook industry now than there was 4 years ago.

I wholeheartedly agree that a truly free market wouldn't work in today's society. My wife and I just had a long discussion on that exact thing about a month ago, and I was using all the same argument points you currently are (yes, I was arguing against an unregulated economy). I'm well aware of the need for some restrictions on businesses, and some minimum requirements for employees; However, the more I see the government telling businesses how to run their businesses the more upset I get. "Some" restrictions is very different than mandating exactly how a business can practice, which is the point I was getting at.

vansmith 08-07-2013 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530687)
I would say that The Great Recession actually supports my argument, not yours. The government has been heavily regulating things since long before this most recent recession, yet it still happened. So, how's that regulation going for us? Really well, by the looks of things.

I don't see how that's the case. How is the unchecked selling of untenable mortgages a product of over-regulation? The governments of the world didn't tell banks and financial institutions to sell bad rates (read that as "unmanageable") nor did the government tell these groups to take part in shady financial practices that ultimately hurts millions. Companies can find ways around things which would suggest the opposite of what you're saying which is the need for closer oversight. A perfect example of this - Canadian banks, during the peak of the financial crisis, received nothing in support because they've always been well regulated (source). In fact, they were still turning profits (albeit considerably smaller) during the peak of the global downturn.

Regulating the actions of groups that are heavily invested in the social good (as banks are) is never a bad thing. And let's not forget the flip side to your argument - the governments were regulating financial institutions when the economy was strong. True, they may have been able to make more but really, there's something to be said for consistency in financial markets and not "let's hope for the best" that comes with ruthless deregulation. You can also enjoy regulation while being free - Canada's economy is heavily regulated in comparison and it is, by some measures, freer (whatever this means) than the American economy (source).

A minor point - the credit rating of the government is wholly exclusive of their regulatory practices. One is about managing their own money (credit rating) and the other is about regulating the spending of other people's money (regulations). The former was significantly hurt by the inability of some groups to regulate their own practices and not an intrinsic fault.

Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530687)
I wholeheartedly agree that a truly free market wouldn't work in today's society. My wife and I just had a long discussion on that exact thing about a month ago, and I was using all the same argument points you currently are (yes, I was arguing against an unregulated economy). I'm well aware of the need for some restrictions on businesses, and some minimum requirements for employees;

Then you don't actually disagree with me?

Quote:

Originally Posted by RONE (Post 1530687)
However, the more I see the government telling businesses how to run their businesses the more upset I get. "Some" restrictions is very different than mandating exactly how a business can practice, which is the point I was getting at.

Collective good over the individual(s) good. On top of that, all regulations restrict how businesses can engage in their various practices (that's what they're designed for).


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.