New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Apple Notebooks Apple's notebook computers including MacBook Pro, MacBook, MacBook Air, PowerBook, and iBook.

MacBook Pro - only 1.8 ghz


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
Gordy77
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Is there a reason apple is only running their notebooks at 1.8 ghz max? I see other companies running with a anywhere from 2 - 2.26 ghz.
QUOTE Thanks
Benjamindaines

 
Benjamindaines's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 08, 2005
Location: A religiously oppressed state
Posts: 2,822
Benjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really nice
Mac Specs: 17" MacBook Pro

Benjamindaines is offline
The reason is that Apple uses different processors in their notebooks then every one else. The chip they use is the G4 chip, which is old and will be slower then Intel/ADM chips (what everyone else is using). Apple also uses a new G5 chip in its desktops but that processor is way to big and hot for a notebook. But the Apple laptops are going to be getting a lot faster due to the switch to Intel chips. Now you may be asking well then why is the MacBook Pro only 1.83 GHz. Well that is because Apple is looking at the grand scheme of things, the processor speed isn't really all that important in the reality of things. What really matters is the bus speed, your processor can only be as useful as how fast you can put information into it. With the slower processors you also get better battery life, the laptops that have 2.26 GHz processors have horrible battery life and again you have all that wasted speed of the processor due to the slow bus speed. To sum it up; the processor speed is more of a "advertising point" rather than an important number now, you must look at all the speeds (RAM, bus speed, ect.)

I hope that explains it for you

--Cheers

QUOTE Thanks
Gordy77
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Yea it does explain alot, i know exacly what you mean by an advertising point as well. So do the macbook pros match up to the competition of the other notebook brands out there. Such as a toshiba or dell?
QUOTE Thanks
jamin

 
Member Since: Jul 17, 2004
Posts: 46
jamin is on a distinguished road

jamin is offline
The Mac Book Pro is a Dual Core CPU. (aka 2 CPU's in 1 chip) The current lineup of Windows Laptops are running Centrino Pentium M Single core CPU's or worse P4 or Celeron based. The Dual core is the next Generation up from the Pentium M. High CPU cycles does not mean faster performance when comparing a Dual Core Intel (Aka Yonah) to Pentium M, P4 etc.

Dell has also started selling Laptops with the Dual Core CPU and they too are only offering 1.6 and 1.8 Ghz versions.
QUOTE Thanks
Benjamindaines

 
Benjamindaines's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 08, 2005
Location: A religiously oppressed state
Posts: 2,822
Benjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really niceBenjamindaines is just really nice
Mac Specs: 17" MacBook Pro

Benjamindaines is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordy77
Yea it does explain alot, i know exacly what you mean by an advertising point as well. So do the macbook pros match up to the competition of the other notebook brands out there. Such as a toshiba or dell?
I haven't had a chance to use one and I haven't read any comparisons between their speed and that of PC notebooks (mostly because no one has any MacBook Pros yet) but I would imagine that the mac speeds would be close if not better (assuming that the PC is dual core too)

QUOTE Thanks
Pierre

 
Pierre's Avatar
 
Member Since: Nov 19, 2005
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 320
Pierre will become famous soon enough
Mac Specs: White 2ghz Core Duo Macbook, 2ghz RAM, 60gb Hard drive, SuperDrive

Pierre is offline
Intel, as well as the rest of the world, is starting to advertise less and less on Ghz speed. Steve Jobs had to explain it to us with the PowerPC chips. Intel used to be able to say "3.2 ghz" and people would go crazy, but when AMD came around and proved that even if an AMD chip says 2.2 Ghz it will own any Intel. What's starting to matter now is 64bit.. b/c most of AMD chips being stuffed into boxes are 64 bit and it is quickly becoming the new standard.

I guarantee that MBPs will get the Merom chip, which is a Dual core 64 bit mobile chip. That will come out late summer, if memory serves me correctly.

Macbook: 2ghz Core Duo, 2gb Ram

Don't forget to use the User Reputation System
QUOTE Thanks
kaidomac

 
Member Since: Jan 18, 2006
Posts: 1,868
kaidomac is just really nicekaidomac is just really nicekaidomac is just really nicekaidomac is just really nice
Mac Specs: G4 Cube

kaidomac is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
Intel, as well as the rest of the world, is starting to advertise less and less on Ghz speed. Steve Jobs had to explain it to us with the PowerPC chips. Intel used to be able to say "3.2 ghz" and people would go crazy, but when AMD came around and proved that even if an AMD chip says 2.2 Ghz it will own any Intel. What's starting to matter now is 64bit.. b/c most of AMD chips being stuffed into boxes are 64 bit and it is quickly becoming the new standard.

I guarantee that MBPs will get the Merom chip, which is a Dual core 64 bit mobile chip. That will come out late summer, if memory serves me correctly.
Regarding processor speeds, normal chips (Pentium 4, Pentium M, etc.) between 2ghz and 2.8ghz feel about the same. The only one that has felt different to me is the 2ghz Athlon 64 Mobile chip in my laptop, which has killed everything else I've used. It creams my 2.8ghz P4 desktop, no question. Also, as mentioned above, the MacBook Pro's proc is dual-core, which will make a nice difference in the upcoming Universal software releases.

Then there's the battey life concern. Adding 400mhz+ the the processor would add more drain to the battery than the 1.83ghz version would. How much exactly, I don't know. But you also have to understand that there are heat and weight issues, too. The faster the processor, the more heat it generates. They've got it in a 5.6-pound box at about an inch thick. My a64 laptop is 1.6" thick and weighs 7.5 pounds. That doesn't sound like a lot more, but it feels like the kitchen sink compared to a Mac laptop. They've done an excellent job designing everything to work well. My laptop has a sub-2 hour battery life; the MacBook will probably have an extra hour or two over that.
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« What's the longest you've gone without your Mac? | iBook Memory Question »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
20" 1.8 ghz iMac vs 17" 2.0 mudger Apple Desktops 12 08-28-2005 05:34 PM
No more 1.8 Ghz PowerMac mmoy Switcher Hangout 8 06-23-2005 11:34 AM
Who's switched to 1.8 GHz single processor Power Mac G5? djmitch Switcher Hangout 9 03-24-2005 10:00 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?