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Apple Notebooks Apple's notebook computers including MacBook Pro, MacBook, MacBook Air, PowerBook, and iBook.

Early 2011 MBP 13 has is hotter than my old MBP !?


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mrpink86

 
Member Since: Jun 05, 2011
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Hi guys,

i recently bought a MBP 13" Early 2011 i7 and made a few tests with it. The result is a bit suprising for me : it seems like it's getting hotter than my old MBP Late 2008.

I just tried CPU-Test Download CPUTest 0.2 Free - Stress test a CPU and its cooling system - Softpedia and checked the temperatures :

Wow! I'm just using 50% CPU but getting 6000rpm while i have a CPU temperature of 194 degrees Fahrenheit.

Is this normal guys?

And if not, what can i do against it?
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pigoo3

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrpink86 View Post
Wow! I'm just using 50% CPU but getting 6000rpm while i have a CPU temperature of 194 degrees Fahrenheit.
Remember...CPU use % does not tell the whole story...you have to factor in GPU use as well. Such as when watching You-Tube videos or playing graphics intensive games.

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Maybe I should apologize if this comes off the wrong way up front. Ok, done.

I would suggest you remove that software from your Mac, forget you ever heard of it and just use and enjoy your computer.

There really is no reason to be running that software on your Mac, nor on any Windows or Linux box that you are running at stock speeds.

Even from the page of your link, their own statement is:

Quote:
CPUTest may be used to verify stability when undervolting and overclocking CPUs.
All of this testing came about years ago from those of us overclocking and increasing the voltage applied to our CPU, GPU, RAM, motherboard, etc.

As one of those involved in overclocking from it's early days, imho, there is no need for any of this on any computer being run at stock speeds.

You have a computer now, with a CPU that's more than twice as fast as it's predecessor, faster bus speeds along with faster RAM and you wonder why the temp might be higher than a previous machine? Here is your answer.

With overclocking and temps, the purpose of our wanting to know temps when applying increasing voltages to our machines and the purpose of the tests we ran was to test the "stability" of the machine at those voltages (as noted in the quote from the software developer even). We didn't want our machines crashing during our favorite game or in the middle of encoding a video or anything else. It was to determine the highest "stable" overclock. It is/was not for temperature testing in and of itself. If our machine didn't crash during the test, then we were good. The only reason to pay attention to the temps, was to attempt to lower them so that we could apply even more voltage for higher overclocks.

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robduckyworth

 
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Im with Bob on this one.

If your Mac starts to shut down unexpectedly, then you have issues with CPU cooling. since it isn't, you don't.

Stop worrying about temperatures.

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