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  1. #1
    vjamacaddict
    Guest
    Question Router Setup/Connection Problems
    I'm still trying to get the router to work with my DSL modem, on my PowerMac 7300/500. No luck yet.

    I'm still not able to get the router to connect properly. The router is a WebRamp. I got to their website and plugged in the correct numbers, but still cannot get online.

    The manual mentions two different cables that came with the router (I don't have those cables): Crossover cable, and Standard cable.

    If I have the wrong cables, could that be the problem? And how do I know which cables I bought? I checked the ends of the cables, and both ends are the same on both cables.

    The company that made the router is out of business. I called Pacbell, and they don't support routers, and cannot give me any information, other than I need to have the TCP/IP set to Ethernet and DHCP. However, another person at PacBell told me I need to set the Router for PPPOE.

    I also tried the PPPOE setting on the router webpage, but that too did not work.

    Is this router not compatible with my DSL modem (SpeedStream 5260)?

    Any ideas? Suggestions?

  2. #2
    Chamorro
    Guest
    Have you tried to plug the DSL modem straight into the Mac first, just to verify the modem's working OK?

  3. #3

    muso's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 15, 2003
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    Whangarei, New Zealand
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    Pwnt
    You'll need your computer set to connect to the net through the ethernet port using DHCP (unless the router doesn't support DHCP, which is unlikely, or you're on a network with more than one router & internet connection, again unlikely). Then, you need to plug the modem into the router, and configure the router to use the modem via PPPoE. When you configure the router this way, it will (or should) do all the work connecting to your isp for you, you just have to make sure that you put the right data into the router.

    MacOSX doesn't care about what type of cable you use. Unfotunately, I don't think OS9 is so friendly. A standard, or patch cable, is usually used to plug computers into a hub or switch (in your case, your router). Crossover cables are used for connections directly between two computers. So if the cables don't say anything on them, you could try connecting two computers and seeing if they can share data or not.
    I'm in your forums, writing sentences in a grammatically acceptable manner.

  4. #4
    vjamacaddict
    Guest
    Question Crossover Cables ?
    I was reading through the Router Manual again, which is somewhat difficult for me to understand. The mentions that two different kinds of cables came with the Router (which I did not receive when I recently purchased the used Router) -- Crossover and Standard cables. My question is -- Do I need to use both the Crossover and Standard cables, in order to get the Router to work with my Modem?

    -- vjamacaddict

    Quote Originally Posted by muso
    You'll need your computer set to connect to the net through the ethernet port using DHCP

    A standard, or patch cable, is usually used to plug computers into a hub or switch (in your case, your router). Crossover cables are used for connections directly between two computers. So if the cables don't say anything on them, you could try connecting two computers and seeing if they can share data or not.

  5. #5

    muso's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 15, 2003
    Location
    Whangarei, New Zealand
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    2
    Specs:
    Pwnt
    Probably not. If it didn't come with any cables, I'd say go to your local electronics store and ask them for a patch cable (standard cable). They'll only be a few dollars. Use this cable between your computer and the router - same goes for any other computer connected to the router. I'd also tentatively suggest you use patch between the router and the modem - I'm not entirely sure though. If you can find an online manual for your router I'd be happy to have a look in it for you.

    If you do have some cables already, check for writing on the cable itself. Mine says (along with a whole lot of abbreviations) "... 50173 CAT.6 PATCH --- UTP ..." - if yours says patch then you've got a standard cable.
    I'm in your forums, writing sentences in a grammatically acceptable manner.

  6. #6

    rman's Avatar
    Member Since
    Dec 24, 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    12,584
    Specs:
    2 x 3.0GHz Quad-Core, 6GB OS X 10.6.8 | 15in MacBook Pro 2.2GHz OS X 10.6.8 | 64GB iPad 2 WiFi
    Cool
    I believe that you use the cross over cable between the modem and the router. You use the straight thru between the router and the computer.
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, It's about learning to dance in the rain!

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