New To Mac-Forums?

Welcome to our community! Join the discussion today by registering your FREE account. If you have any problems with the registration process, please contact us!

Get your questions answered by community gurus • Advice and insight from world-class Apple enthusiasts • Exclusive access to members-only contests, giveaways and deals

Join today!

 
Start a Discussion
 

Mac-Forums Brief

Subscribe to Mac-Forums Brief to receive special offers from Mac-Forums partners and sponsors

Join the conversation RSS
Apple Desktops Discussion of Apple's desktop machines including Mac Pro, iMac, Power Mac, and mini

How Do You Connect WD Hard Drives in G5 Quad


Post Reply New Thread Subscribe

 
Thread Tools
Robert Graham
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I'm trying to install two Wester Digital 120GB SATA II 3.0 (WD Caviar SE, WD1200JB Enhanced IDE) hard drives in my G5 Quad 2.5 GHz and the Mac connectors do not match the pins on the hard drives. Are there adapters for this conversion, will a different manufacturer's SATA3 3.0 drive plug in, or should I give up and go for another stock (slower) SATA2 drive?
QUOTE Thanks
Avalon

 
Avalon's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 25, 2004
Location: Luxemburg, Europe
Posts: 1,779
Avalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really nice
Mac Specs: PowerMac G5 Dual 2GHz (June 2004), 2.5GB, Airport, black 5G iPod 30GB, white MacBook 2.0 2GB

Avalon is offline
I'm not sure if the connectors are different between SATA1, 2 or 3, but the G5 isn't SATA 2 or 3 compliant...so even if it would fit, you wouldn't have any speed benefit.
QUOTE Thanks
Bill Gates

 
Member Since: Apr 30, 2006
Posts: 16
Bill Gates is an unknown at this point

Bill Gates is offline
"How Do You Connect WD Hard Drives "

Plug them in?



Haha, yeah GOOD question, idiot.
QUOTE Thanks
Hoad

 
Member Since: Apr 30, 2006
Posts: 9
Hoad is an unknown at this point

Hoad is offline
Oh this is simple my friend. Take the red wire, and connect it to a 13A fuse. Then cut the green wire and wrap the bare bit around the pink wire. Boot up your PC as normal.
QUOTE Thanks
Bluesmudge

 
Member Since: Mar 04, 2006
Posts: 230
Bluesmudge will become famous soon enough

Bluesmudge is offline
IDE drives dont work in the G5's, you need a SATA hard drive.
QUOTE Thanks
baggss

 
baggss's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 10, 2004
Location: Margaritaville
Posts: 10,309
baggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 27" 3.4 Ghz i7 iMac-13" C2D Macbook-OSX 18.8.2-64Gb iPad 2-32 Gb iPhone 5-ATV 2-14Tb of Storage

baggss is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Graham
I'm trying to install two Wester Digital 120GB SATA II 3.0 (WD Caviar SE, WD1200JB Enhanced IDE) hard drives in my G5 Quad 2.5 GHz and the Mac connectors do not match the pins on the hard drives. Are there adapters for this conversion, will a different manufacturer's SATA3 3.0 drive plug in, or should I give up and go for another stock (slower) SATA2 drive?
I don't think there are adapters. The documentation that comes with the Quad very specifically says SATA and not SATA3 so I suspect you may have to go with a slower drive.

Whatever you figure out, please let me know. I'll be looking to put another drive in my Quad and would like to know as well.


QUOTE Thanks
Robert Graham
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon
I'm not sure if the connectors are different between SATA1, 2 or 3, but the G5 isn't SATA 2 or 3 compliant...so even if it would fit, you wouldn't have any speed benefit.
Thanks for responding. The G5 specs say the stock 250 GB drive is SATA 1.5 Gbps, but not if it is SATA II.

"...Serial ATA supports 1.5-Gbps throughput per channel (equivalent to a data rate of 150 MBps). The Power Mac G5 can hold two internal 500GB Serial ATA drives for a total capacity of 1TB of storage."

Are you saying the Mac's IDE host interface can't read SATA 2 and 3?
QUOTE Thanks
Robert Graham
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesmudge
IDE drives dont work in the G5's, you need a SATA hard drive.
From what I've read, all SATA drives are IDE drives:

"Usually, these devices connect to the computer through an Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) interface. Essentially, an IDE interface is a standard way for a storage device to connect to a computer. IDE is actually not the true technical name for the interface standard. The original name, AT Attachment (ATA), signified that the interface was initially developed for the IBM AT computer."

SATA is "Serial AT Attachment". I think the original ATA drives were parallel.
QUOTE Thanks
Avalon

 
Avalon's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 25, 2004
Location: Luxemburg, Europe
Posts: 1,779
Avalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really nice
Mac Specs: PowerMac G5 Dual 2GHz (June 2004), 2.5GB, Airport, black 5G iPod 30GB, white MacBook 2.0 2GB

Avalon is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Graham
Are you saying the Mac's IDE host interface can't read SATA 2 and 3?
The G5s SATA controller is only standard SATA. SATA 2 (and probably SATA 3) drives are downwards compatible, means that, when connected to a standard SATA, they work in SATA mode, not SATA 2 or 3.
That in return means that you won't have any advantage by putting the faster SATA 2 or 3 disks in a G5, as data transfer would be at normal SATA speeds.

To use those drives, you need a SATA 2 or 3 controller card that is Mac compatible. Just keep in mind that the PowerMacs with dual core have PCI express (PCIe) while the older single cores have either PCI or PCI-X. PCIe is NOT backwards compatible to PCI/PCI-X.

And yes, both serial ATA and parallel ATA are IDE drives.
QUOTE Thanks
baggss

 
baggss's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 10, 2004
Location: Margaritaville
Posts: 10,309
baggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 27" 3.4 Ghz i7 iMac-13" C2D Macbook-OSX 18.8.2-64Gb iPad 2-32 Gb iPhone 5-ATV 2-14Tb of Storage

baggss is offline
From browsing hard drives yesterday it appears that what is needed is Serial SATA, not plain SATA. Serial uses the new interface (Small Cable) vice the standards SATA IDE interface (ribbon cable). I realize calling it Serial SATA is sort of a misnomer, but that is how the HDD boxes are labled. The standard SATA boxes show the IDE interface.


QUOTE Thanks
Avalon

 
Avalon's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 25, 2004
Location: Luxemburg, Europe
Posts: 1,779
Avalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really niceAvalon is just really nice
Mac Specs: PowerMac G5 Dual 2GHz (June 2004), 2.5GB, Airport, black 5G iPod 30GB, white MacBook 2.0 2GB

Avalon is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by baggss
From browsing hard drives yesterday it appears that what is needed is Serial SATA, not plain SATA. Serial uses the new interface (Small Cable) vice the standards SATA IDE interface (ribbon cable). I realize calling it Serial SATA is sort of a misnomer, but that is how the HDD boxes are labled. The standard SATA boxes show the IDE interface.
What brand sells it's disks in that boxes?!?
The labels on those boxes are simply wrong...

SATA is Serial ATA, while parallel ATA often simply is referenced as ATA. Serial SATA doesn't make any sense, as the S in SATA means serial. :cool:

SATA IDE uses the small cable, while plain ATA IDE uses a ribbon cable.
QUOTE Thanks
baggss

 
baggss's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 10, 2004
Location: Margaritaville
Posts: 10,309
baggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond reputebaggss has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 27" 3.4 Ghz i7 iMac-13" C2D Macbook-OSX 18.8.2-64Gb iPad 2-32 Gb iPhone 5-ATV 2-14Tb of Storage

baggss is offline
I may have read it wrong, it may have said Serial ATA, vice SATA, but it definitely did say Serial and showed the cable I linked to above.


QUOTE Thanks
Robert Graham
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
Originally Posted by baggss
From browsing hard drives yesterday it appears that what is needed is Serial SATA, not plain SATA. Serial uses the new interface (Small Cable) vice the standards SATA IDE interface (ribbon cable). I realize calling it Serial SATA is sort of a misnomer, but that is how the HDD boxes are labled. The standard SATA boxes show the IDE interface.
Hey Baggss-

Here's what happened and what I learned.

Mac Connection is sending me two Maxtor, SATA 1.5 Gbps, 300 GB drives to replace the two Western Digital, SATA 3.0 Gbps, 120 GB drives that wouldn't connect. When I ordered the WDs I was looking for speed, not capacity, but I'll settle to get this beautiful thing running.

When you go to make a purchase, remember one thing, G5s require blade, not pin connectors.

Someone said that I needed SATA drives, not IDE drives. SATA drives are IDE drives. IDE is the name for the interface... "Usually, these devices connect to the computer through an Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) interface. Essentially, an IDE interface is a standard way for a storage device to connect to a computer. IDE is actually not the true technical name for the interface standard. The original name, AT Attachment (ATA), signified that the interface was initially developed for the IBM AT computer."

SATA means Serial ATA. It is now the industry-standard storage interface, replacing the Parallel ATA interface... "Designed to keep pace with the demands of digital video creation and editing, audio storage and playback, and other data-intensive applications, Serial ATA supports 1.5-Gbps throughput per channel (equivalent to a data rate of 150 MBps).

The drives I wanted were SATA 3.0 Gbps. This is often called SATA II, but "II" really indicates the name of the committee/organization formed to author the SATA specifications. The SATA 3.0 drives would have had nearly twice the transfer rate of Apple's SATA 1.5 Gbps stock drive. SATA 3.0 drives are backward compatible, so they will replace Apple's stock drives, using the same interface connectors. The "controllers" are on the drives and the motherboard and System X (maybe only 10.4?) will recognize them. The Power Mac G5 can hold two internal 500GB Serial ATA drives for a total capacity of 1TB of storage.

Another important thing is the size of the drives Buffer. Most SATA drives have an 8 MB buffer, but the latest drives have 16 MB and are able to read/write faster.

So, I would look for 3.5" SATA 3.0 Gbps drives, with a 16 MB cache and spade type connectors. I know they are out there, I just didn't want to wait to find them.

Here's some reading that helped me. See what it says to you.

http://www.serialata.org/

http://www.geek.com/news/geeknews/20...0922021866.htm

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/ide.htm
QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


« imac macos 9.2 issue....... | frontraw question for intel iMac owners »
Thread Tools

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Are Firewire hard drives powered through the firewire connection ? kevin-h Other Hardware and Peripherals 3 03-03-2006 06:31 PM
Solid State Hard Drives PowerBookG4 Schweb's Lounge 10 08-31-2005 06:54 PM
External Hard drives j_wood Other Hardware and Peripherals 0 03-01-2004 12:02 PM
whats up with the 4200 and 5400 rpm hard drives? h3o Apple Notebooks 1 02-17-2004 10:09 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:01 AM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
X

Welcome to Mac-Forums.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this community the ultimate source for your Mac since 2003!


(4 digit year)

Already a member?