. Updates, Apple updates are pretty painless. They will pop up once a week at best, and you can choose to run them or postpone if you are busy. They tend to download in the background and then run very quickly. Unless the upgrade is to the OS" /> Mac Forums - View Single Post - First post with a question before I make the switch
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louishen

 
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Mac Specs: Mac Mini Core i7 2012 | White 2009 MacBook 2 Ghz | 733 Mhz G4 Quicksilver

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1. Updates, Apple updates are pretty painless. They will pop up once a week at best, and you can choose to run them or postpone if you are busy. They tend to download in the background and then run very quickly. Unless the upgrade is to the OS itself, application updates will not require a restart, and the OS ones will not force you to restart.
In short, they are easy and hassle free.

2. Virus scans. I know us Mac users can be a bit smug on that one, but there are no viruses on OSX, and only a few Trojan horses - which you will have to award permission to install. So no constant virus scans, in fact for many, none at all. While I am not advocating never having any protection, I manually run a scan with the free ClamX once in a while, when I feel the need. It never finds anything but I guess it pays to be vigilant.

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