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Raz0rEdge

 
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Member Since: Jul 17, 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 7,389
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Mac Specs: 27" i7 iMac, 24" iMac, 13" Macbook Air, iPhone 5 & 5S, iPod Nano 7th Gen, iPad 2 16GB WiFi, iPad 3

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Objective-C is indeed a language, it adds OOP (Object Oriented Programming) mechanics to C and is the chosen language for programming on the Mac.

Cocoa is the framework provided by Apple to program applications on the Mac, a version of this framework has been created for the iPod Touch/iPhone called Cocoa Touch.

To develop native applications on the iPod/iPhone that are not gaming related you need to learn Obj-C and the Cocoa Touch framework and use the various interfaces provided to you.

The moment you say you want to do a game, you need to being OpenGL and OpenAL into the picture and these are the graphics and audio frameworks respectively.

There are some alternates to dealing with OpenGL (or at least limiting how much you use it) by using things like cocos2d which is a gaming framework that allows you to get going quickly.

YOu will want to take a look at these 2 books, they deal with learning Objective-C and the iPhone SDK.

Amazon.com: Programming in Objective-C 2.0 (2nd Edition) (9780321566157): Stephen G. Kochan: Books
Amazon.com: Beginning iPhone Development: Exploring the iPhone SDK (9781430216261): Dave Mark, Jeff LaMarche: Books

Now if you have no coding experience at all, do it the right way by first learning the language and then the SDK and go from there. Expect to spend minimally 3-6 months to get fully comfortable with Obj-C and another 2-4 months with the SDK..

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