View Single Post
vansmith

 
vansmith's Avatar
 
Member Since: Oct 19, 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 17,139
vansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond reputevansmith has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 2012 13" MBP (2.5 i5, 8GB)

vansmith is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasn't me View Post
Now ive gone into bootcamp and it has the option to remove my xp part and use all the memory for mac os, but it says its only 296g of memory. so where has the 24g gone. I understand that the actually os system uses some of it but isn't 24g a bit much.....am i missing something.
It's how a hard drive size is calculated. Most operating systems including OS X pre-10.6 measure(d) hard drive size using base-2 notation. In other words, a MB was equal to 1024 KB and a GB was equal to 1024 MB and so on. When you buy a hard drive from a store, the size is measured in base-10 notation meaning that a MB equals 1000 KB and a GB equals 1000 MB. So, under Leopard, the hard drive size is calculated as being ~298 GB because the size is "converted" from base-10 to base-2. If you use the calculator here, it will show you that a base-10 HD size of 320 GB is 298.02GB is base-2 notation.

Starting with Snow Leopard, OS X measures hard drive sizes with base-10 notation, much like manufacturers do. So, my 320GB HD is now reported as 319.73GB.

Important Links: Community Guidelines : Use the reputation system if you've been helped.
M-F Blog :: Write for the blog
Mac-Forums Investigates MacKeeper - Confused about MacKeeper? Take a look at this review.
QUOTE Thanks