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Kash

 
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Member Since: Dec 03, 2006
Location: Irvine, CA
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Whether you can read and write to it from both operating systems depends wholly on two things. One, whether it's in a file system that can be read and written to natively by both operating systems. If the first condition is not met, then you have a second option, and that would be to install software that allows the operating systems to read and write to non-native file systems.

So if it's formatted as FAT32 (i.e. MS-DOS), then you're set. If it's NTFS, then Windows can read/write to it, but OS X can only read from it. If it's HFS+ (i.e. Mac OS Extended), then OS X can read/write to it, but Windows won't be able to see it at all.

In order to get OS X to write to NTFS, you'll need something like MacFUSE to enable write functionality. To get Windows to write to HFS+, you'll need to install MacDrive, which unlike MacFUSE, is not free.

Your best bet would be to just use FAT32 as it's the easiest path for when sharing a drive between Windows and OS X.


June 2007
July 2009
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