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pigoo3

 
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Member Since: May 20, 2008
Location: U.S.
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Mac Specs: 13" MB 2.4ghz, 2gig ram, OS 10.7.5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Binary_Kramer View Post
I see pictures from the research I have done. Like the one I attached below, it refers to a G3Hot location? Could you at least tell what this does and how to test it?
I'm not trying to sound like a "wise-guy"...but did you read the red lettered decription in the photo?...it pretty much says what it does. "Shorting-Out" these two spots on the logic board...is a way to start the computer. Someone would do this if they thought they had a bad power button. A "professional" may also do this for various reasons (such as activate the logic board on the repair bench if it were attached to a power source).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Binary_Kramer View Post
If there is no way to test and find a fault location is there at least a way to test the entire board or see if one main item is or is not receiving power?
There probably is...but not something you or I could do as amateur compute repair people. Also...there really aren't that many "main items" on the logic board. It's mostly teeny-weeny circuits (transistors, capacitors, resistors)...which are too small to replace (and there's probably no way to find replacement parts).

Everything is VERY small & soldered onto the logic board...and amateur home repair folks cannot make these repairs. I'm not even sure if Apple even repairs busted logic boards. Bad ones that they replace may simply be tossed into the trash. It may be too labor intensive...or even downright impossible to repair a modern logic board.

Believe me...I'm a pretty frugile person...and I do my own repairs on everything. If repairing a computers logic board were possible by a home user...I would most likely know how (or at least if it were possible)...and I would be doing it!

- Nick

- Computer slow, too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
- Computer seems slower than it used to? Read this for some speedup tips: Speedup
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