Thread: The SSD Thread
View Single Post
cwa107

 
cwa107's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 20, 2006
Location: Middletown, Pennsylvania
Posts: 26,487
cwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond reputecwa107 has a reputation beyond repute
Mac Specs: 15" MBP, Core i7/2GHz, 8GB RAM, 480GB Crucial M500 SSD

cwa107 is offline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cableaddict View Post

Does switching to an SSD boot drive offer any benefits besides just faster boot times? I mean, who really cares about faster boot times?
Yes. It speeds up all disk I/O, which is by far the largest bottleneck for any modern computer. Simply put, you no longer need to wait for the drive to move the head to the appropriate portion of the disk and begin reading (or writing) data.

The difference is like going from floppy disks to hard drives.

Quote:
OK, there is an advantage in power usage, but few pros are going to care about that.
There's in advantage in heat generation, which I guess has some merit.

- But what about application speed? Do huge applications (Protools, Photoshop, etc) run any faster with an SSD boot drive? I don't mean the sessions themselves, which are always going to be on a separate drive anyway, I mean the applications themselves, which do reside on the boot drive.
Yes, any application that lives on an SSD (whether it's the boot drive or not) is going to load faster and as it interacts with the OS and/or loads more components, it's going to be faster. Also, virtual memory utilization doesn't have the same kind of drag that it would when the swap file is stored on a traditional HDD.

Quote:
I have search many times, and can't find a single piece of data on this. I thus assume the answer is "no," but it would be very good to know for sure.

So?
Well, I almost hate to say it, but the most likely reason you haven't found any specific commentary on it, is because it's elementary. Any time you increase throughput on mass storage, you're going to see an overall performance increase.

Now, if you're doing video editing or another task that requires vast amounts of disk space, you'll definitely want to keep a (cheaper) HDD around for data files - and you won't realize as much of a performance difference when working with those files (loading them and saving them), since you'll still be dealing with the same kind of latency. But, you'll still see an overall performance difference because the files that are accessed most frequently (OS and application elements) no longer take as long to traverse the gap from the "disk's" physical medium, through the bus and into the CPU.

Liquid and computers don't mix. It might seem simple, but we see an incredible amount of people post here about spills. Keep drinks and other liquids away from your expensive electronics!
QUOTE Thanks