Learning the Commandline – Looking at files

By now you should know your way around the file system and how to move around (if you don’t, go back and read the other articles. This is a series after all ). You may have wondered, “I have all these files, how do I see what’s inside them in Terminal?” There’s an app for that (sorry, couldn’t resist). Enter the cat command and it’s helpers. We’re also going to learn what a pipe is. cat is *nix for catalog, as in a listing of what’s in a file. ANY …

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Learning the Command Line – Editing files

Terminal — nano — test1-1

In this session we are going to learn one way of editing text files in Terminal. Back in the day there was pico. This was the editor part of the Pine mail program used in *nix. It was a very simple plain text editor used to create mail and text files. There are other editors such as vi, vim and emacs but those can get complicated and very powerful; these aren’t really needed to create or edit a simple text file. Fast forward to today, we now have nano, the …

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Learning the Command Line – Bash Prompts (1)

Terminal — bash — 94×23 2014-03-27 16-38-17 2014-03-27 16-38-20

NOTE: This article assumes you have been following the other articles in this series. Another Note: I can’t take credit for this. I got it from a now defunct website called dotfiles.com. I don’t remember who the original author was and I’ve edited it to suit me. I won’t be explaining every little detail because some are more advanced. If you’ve been keeping up with this series, you’ll know I’ve promised you a little magic. This is it and you might learn a little something too. It’s really simple but …

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These Permissions Are Not The Repairs You’re Looking For – A Critical Look at Permissions in OS X

Screenshot 2013-11-29 11.14.32

So, your Mac is acting up. Indeed, a Mac is no more impervious to Murphy’s Law than a non-Mac PC (I use PC here in the literal sense to signify personal computer). What do you do when the inevitable occurs? The first response for many to this will differ – some will seek out a solution, some will be adept enough to tackle the problem head on, some will likely do some sort of voodoo dance (if life has taught me anything, it’s that if you can imagine it, someone …

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Learning the Command Line – File Permissions

Ever have a file you can’t do anything with? Can’t change it, can’t delete it, can’t even look at it? We’re going to find out why. FreeBSD, and by extension, OS X (which is loosely based on FreeBSD), uses file permissions. This lets the system control access to files and directories by different users. Would you want another user looking at your files? Of course not. Permissions determine who can access any file or directory and whether it can be edited or deleted. There are three types of access for …

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Mac-Forums Investigates MacKeeper

MacKeeper Default View

Update (July 27, 2013): Grammar/spelling errors corrected and a short section about Mac-Forums’ relationship to the product was added. Introduction One of the persistent questions around the forum has to do with a piece of software called MacKeeper. A cursory scan of the forum will paint in the minds of new members a confusing picture. On the one hand, many of our community members argue against it, describing it as bad, harmful, problematic and, my favourite, akin to snake oil (thanks to chscag for that one). On the other, the software is a permanent …

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The Mysterious File:/// Bug

Recently, there has been a rather silent but important story floating around about an odd bug built into Cocoa (OS X’s application programming interface that, in part, includes the user interface elements of OS X including things like buttons and text boxes). Although not generating a lot of news, this is an interesting bug that’s worth exploring. Triggering the Bug The bug manifests itself simply by typing File:/// into any native Cocoa widget. Open up any application that uses Cocoa for its text boxes and enter that string. Press space …

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Flash v. JavaScript: Is One Really Better Than The Other?

Introduction A quick search of the forums will reveal a particular unabashed bias towards technologies that leverage anything but Adobe’s Flash. To a certain extent, this is justified but should non-Flash based solutions always be the right method of delivering content? To answer this question, I investigated the efficacy of both Flash and its most often articulated “competitor” JavaScript1 to see how well they work in different situations. The Tests Before outlining the tests used to explore each technology, it’s important to note that I do not seek to suggest …

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Not using Flash? You need Switch

Switch-1

Running your computer without Flash installed is great. No unnecessary resource hogging while browsing the web. No annoying animated web ads. Unfortunately, not everything on the web is HTML5. This is where Switch comes in. I use Safari 99% of the time until I stumble across something that is Flash content. This happens frequently when I’m browsing Kickstarter since they are still using flash for their introduction videos (this has since changed, they are now using HTML5). When this happens, I load up Chrome (it has its own self-contained Flash …

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OSX Lion Server Part 03 – Getting the Router Prepared

03-Getting-the-router-prepared

OSX Lion Server part 03 – Getting the Router Prepared We’ve dealt with the types of server installs in part 01 of this series and the network set-up we need to have in place in part 02. Before we jump in and actually install the software there is one final stage we have to look at before we continue, and that’s router set-up. Your network router is set-up to allow common tasks like web browsing and mail traffic to come in and out. However, many potential services are blocked by default. …

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