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JRV
12-03-2007, 09:52 PM
I was just wondering if the opinion changed from person to person? How long are you considered entry level?

mac57
12-03-2007, 10:14 PM
Could you get a bit more detailed? Entry Level at what? I am not sure I understand.

Sgt Beavis
12-04-2007, 09:40 AM
I was just wondering if the opinion changed from person to person? How long are you considered entry level?

If you are at Walmart, you are always entry level.

mac57
12-04-2007, 11:30 AM
As a general comment, at most jobs, you are "entry level" until you demonstrate, through experienced handling of your job, that you no longer are!

PowerBookG4
12-04-2007, 11:54 AM
yes i am confused about this topic, may you please elaborate?

gomez1018
12-04-2007, 12:14 PM
On job websites such as monster entry level tends to mean the 1st year in the job market not including summer jobs. To employers it may vary based on what you have demonstrated at certain positions, coupled with you accomplishments. For example, some employers may think that a college grad with a 8 month internship may be above the entry level and be more experinced than the 2 year (associated degree) with 2 years of real job experience; and vce versa. This also works with masters degree. I knew a guy when I was in college that had no experience because he went straight to grad school after graduating from undergrad. When he went to apply he had a hard time getting a job because he had no real world experience. On teh flip though when he did find his job it was quite a well paying job.

I think I went a little deeper than you wanted, but I was rolling :) o well.

fleurya
12-04-2007, 03:30 PM
I think it varies greatly from job to job. I also think that if you don't know what the line is for entry level and experienced in a certain job, then not only are you most likely entry level, but you also need to do some more research on the job itself.

Your best bet it to find someone already in the field you're looking into and get their opinion. If you talk to the right people, and show a lot of interest, you even talk yourself right into a job in the process!

eric
12-04-2007, 04:18 PM
depends on where you park.

mac57
12-04-2007, 07:55 PM
depends on where you park.

Nice, very nice! :D

thedood
12-04-2007, 08:18 PM
On job websites such as monster entry level tends to mean the 1st year in the job market not including summer jobs. To employers it may vary based on what you have demonstrated at certain positions, coupled with you accomplishments. For example, some employers may think that a college grad with a 8 month internship may be above the entry level and be more experinced than the 2 year (associated degree) with 2 years of real job experience; and vce versa. This also works with masters degree. I knew a guy when I was in college that had no experience because he went straight to grad school after graduating from undergrad. When he went to apply he had a hard time getting a job because he had no real world experience. On teh flip though when he did find his job it was quite a well paying job.

I think I went a little deeper than you wanted, but I was rolling :) o well.
Actually gomez, you pretty much nailed it.


I think it varies greatly from job to job. I also think that if you don't know what the line is for entry level and experienced in a certain job, then not only are you most likely entry level, but you also need to do some more research on the job itself.

Your best bet it to find someone already in the field you're looking into and get their opinion. If you talk to the right people, and show a lot of interest, you even talk yourself right into a job in the process!
You also give a pretty accurate account for entry level. But I wanted to add it is important when you mentioned; "If you talk to the right people" - Finding the right people is very important when researching a career field. In many fields, people will lie to you for a variety of reasons, including the fact they will not offer support for fear of having to compete against you too. This is true in the film and television industry and most other industries where freelancer's are common.

coach_z
12-04-2007, 09:16 PM
even if it is entry level and you believe you are beyond entry level but you like the job then still applly because you might be able to get more out of them then you normally would if you were to their standards of entry level....normally i would think of entry level as your first sales job or in sales for less then one year
-chris

Cherokee
12-05-2007, 10:14 AM
If you work entry level at a parking garage, there is always room to move up.

If you work in a one story building, you will always be entry level.

fleurya
12-05-2007, 01:31 PM
If you work entry level at a parking garage, there is always room to move up.


What if it's an underground garage? :o

Have I blown your mind yet? :P

RiDE
12-05-2007, 01:44 PM
I was just wondering if the opinion changed from person to person? How long are you considered entry level?

One post about.. umm... something???? Then no response whatsoever???!!!

Apologize to "the unit"!!!!!!!!!!!!!