PDA

View Full Version : Beginning photographer . . .



fleurya
05-05-2007, 03:55 AM
I'm trying to get into the photography hobby. I've found tons of information on what SLRs are good for beginners and I even got in on that deal for a free copy of Rapidweaver and a good free photo editing app I can't recall the name of right now.

Now my only problem is, learning how to actually take good pictures!! If anyone can point out a good resource for learning the basics, a free website preferably, please let me know.

Thanks!

Say_Cheese
05-05-2007, 08:00 AM
Hi,

Glad to see someone else who is getting into the Photography game.

As for instruction it depends upon what you want to photograph. I can however recommend the following links.

British Magazine for General Information (http://www.photographymonthly.com/)
Info on General basics (http://www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/664)
Tutorials on digital Photography (http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials.htm)
A magazine on Outdoor Photography (http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/)
Good fourms here on all aspects of digital cameras and associated stuff (http://www.dpreview.com/)

Hope that the above are useful.

I would suggest that if you can you get to your local newsagents and see what magazines they have on photography. It is such a popular subject that so many magazines are produced each month on the topic.

The best way that I can recommend to get yourself taking good pictures is to get out there and practice. I would say that you should take photos of anything and everything.

I don't know what camera you are getting/have got but if you have one where you can play around with the shutter speeds and apertures and ISO settings then do so. See how the results differ from your own experiences, eventually you should be able to go to almost any lighting situation and know what ISO you will want to use and what shutter speed and aperture combination you will need. You can read all you like but knowledge is no substitute for pratical experience.

I basically self taught myself for years and built up a portfolio, then I managed to get a job with an advertising photographers as a junior. Unfortunately i'm not in the industy now as the company was liquidated but I still do a lot of my own stuff for my own pleasure. I'm still learning, we all are. Thankfully digital makes it cheaper to make errors than when on film.

Go practise and keep experiementing.

Good luck

Aaagogo
05-05-2007, 10:16 AM
try getting this book by Bryan Peterson "Understanding Exposure"

U will need to learn some basic photoshop skills and then the rest would be to get bit by the shutter bug and start snapping away.

What kind of photography are you looking at getting into?

Landscape, Macro, Glamour, Still Life... there is an extensive list, reason being the DLSR body is as limited to the lens that you have on it. IE to say, you can't put on a wide angle lens and expect to shoot a tiny bug and want it to look like a macro shot.

As you say you wanna get into photography, 1st thing 1st, what body did u get for ur DSLR, from there, research and see which are your affordable lens that you can purchase, and try learning with that lens, things like framing a shot, exposure, DOF and if u find a specific area in photography which you like, go on the web or bookstore and look at how other's compose their shots and get inspiration from them and learn how to reproduce the same shot, then maybe you will come up with your preferred style of shooting. Primes are much better for learning, they can be more difficult because of it's fixed FL but also the fastest way to learn photography IMO.

there are tons of camera brand specific forums out there, and also a forums on specific types of shooting style.

Hope the info helps :)

GulfVetSAF
05-05-2007, 11:31 AM
Hey! Glad to know another photographer. A few months ago I bought my first DSLR as well (Nike D80). I've take a few courses online (www.ed2go.com (http://www.mac-forums.com/forums/www.ed2go.com) "secrets to better photography") but it's not free.

However, I'm guessing you're wanting to learn about aperture, focus settings, lenses and all that stuff. I'm not sure where you're at, but where I live we have this place called "The Sawtooth Center." It's a hobbyist of sorts hangout (painting, pottery and photography) and they have some really great classes (cheap too). I know you're not here in NC, LOL but I would check around the neighborhood and see. Reading is one thing and even taking classes helps but doing it with hands on instruction is in my opinion the best. Oh, also, you might want to check with some camera stores. They often offer certificates to classes free with a purchase and if you're smooth a lot of times you can get a few for free.

So, I hope this helped you a little man. I'll do some searching and let you know if I found any more sites, off the top of my head check out these sites (forums there as well).

Scott

http://www.photography.com/
http://photo.net/

Odin_aa
05-05-2007, 05:23 PM
Try phototakers.com for learning the basics, plenty of good posts there to read and several people willing to teach the fundamentals...what aperture, shutter speed, ISO all mean and how to use them.

TenderSurrender
05-06-2007, 07:00 AM
I think most importantly though, the thing to do is...

TAKE LOTS OF PHOTOS!

I have only attended a couple of lessons on photography of which I feel I didnt learn a lot anyway, but instead teach myself by taking a photo, changing the settings and doing it again. Review when you get home and then you will begin to learn what works :)

~~ TS ~~

cjay
05-06-2007, 06:48 PM
I think most importantly though, the thing to do is...

TAKE LOTS OF PHOTOS!

I have only attended a couple of lessons on photography of which I feel I didnt learn a lot anyway, but instead teach myself by taking a photo, changing the settings and doing it again. Review when you get home and then you will begin to learn what works :)

~~ TS ~~

I second that.

Also learn your camera inside out and how to use it manually. Look at lots of photos. Train your eye to see photographically. When you're out and about look around you and mentally picture how you would photograph something. If you do it often enough you'll find yourself visualising in your mind before you even touch the camera.

fleurya
05-07-2007, 07:15 AM
Thanks for all the suggestions. I haven't replied because I was visiting family and they way out where the only option for internet is still dialup!! (yes, those places still exist).

I haven't gotten a camera yet, but I'm most-likely going to do with Canon because they have a lot of rep and I've always used their point-and-shoot cameras. I've never messed with manual controls at all, so I guess you could say I'm starting at the bottom. I mostly want to do some casual photography of landscape, macro, vacation stuff that actually looks good, and whatever else comes my way.

I wanted to take some photography classes at a local college, but they make you go through a lot of extra stuff using film and black and white only shots before you can even get into digital photography. I'm sure that's all really good to know, but I'm not trying to be a pro or dedicate so much time.

Thanks again for you help. I'm going to do some more shopping for cameras and I'll probably be back with more questions!

yogi
05-07-2007, 07:37 AM
... because they have a lot of rep ....

You mean, they com with green dots?


As for the learning-by-doing, I concur. But if you know your theory, you will have an eye for it in practice. Say you know everything about f-stop and exposure. Once you're out in the field taking photos, you'll be able to diagnose them better if you know the technical mumbo-jumbo a bit.

It's like being a doctor. You know you (your photo) have (has) a stomach ache but only your doctor will tell you it's a tumor and they'll have to operate (sorry for being so macabre).

Roger
05-07-2007, 11:10 AM
Check out this site. Look at the index along the left side. Good luck.



http://photography.about.com/

Sa!!yz~Rage
05-09-2007, 03:14 PM
Number one - Buy pro glass. If you're serious and you want good files to work with spend the extra money. You don't have to buy new, just buy pro. The lens is the weak link in the system.

You will get higher quality images with a cheap camera using a pro lens than a pro camera using a cheapo lens.

Remember you will dump your camera body for a new model one day, but if you buy pro glass it stays with you. ;D [Unless a van backs up over your bag and crushes it... :Angry: But that's another story.]

Village Idiot
05-09-2007, 03:24 PM
Number one - Buy pro glass. If you're serious and you want good files to work with spend the extra money. You don't have to buy new, just buy pro. The lens is the weak link in the system.

You will get higher quality images with a cheap camera using a pro lens than a pro camera using a cheapo lens.

Remember you will dump your camera body for a new model one day, but if you buy pro glass it stays with you. ;D [Unless a van backs up over your bag and crushes it... :Angry: But that's another story.]

but used L lenses cost just as much as new L lenses.

Sa!!yz~Rage
05-09-2007, 03:33 PM
but used L lenses cost just as much as new L lenses

Yes it can, and that tells you something about it. ;D Depends on what it is, and how old it is.

You will have to look for around for it for sure. You will have to hunt for those deals, but it's worth it.Try www.sportsshooter.com (http://www.sportsshooter.com) there are some deals there sometimes, and you will always find fast glass there.