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sarasharrock
03-27-2017, 12:57 PM
Internet World isn't As Fancy As People Think It Is!! :Lips-Are-Sealed:

What do you guys have to say about this recent bill that i suppose has been submitted day before yesterday .. in Senate, that all of the things we do on the internet will be watched, tracked and what not.
Internet ain't that fancy as we think it is! :Confused:

PS: let's remember this still has to pass the House. Call your reps. Fax your reps. Whine on their facebook pages.

Any more suggestions, on how to be encrypted online? or any vpn!

Raz0rEdge
03-27-2017, 01:02 PM
Just for historical content, this information was always being tracked and the ISPs had done various things with it like marketing things to you specifically or choosing to give certain people better access or so on. That is, a site could pay more to get faster access to its customers while those who didn't pay would get slower access..

Some of these went away with Net Neutrality where it was deemed that all traffic should be deemed the same and one vendor shouldn't get preferential treatment over another.

As far as protecting yourself, a VPN will help greatly in hiding your browsing..

Cr00zng
03-28-2017, 08:53 AM
There isn't really much you can do, once you access the Internet. Your ISP, VPN provider, etc., are free to monitor/record your adventures on the web. Both the ISP and the VPN provider can do this without you noticing it. Selling all the personal information and data to data brokers and/or advertisers directly is an additional revenue source that is hard to resists. Since businesses receive preferential treatments from the government, of course legalizing this behavior is preferred hence the introduction of the referenced bill.

With that said, there are certain measures that you can take to prevent the collection. You can use Opera with its built-in free VPN connection in tandem with DNSCrypt. The latter one encrypts all DNS queries and does not use the ISP's DNS server for lookup. Alternatively, you could also use the TOR browser with DNSCrypt. Even in these cases, ISP will know the IP for the VPN server, the first TOR node and for the DNSCrypt. But that's all they know. Please keep in mind that the exit nodes of the VPN can still record all your activities and sell your personal information and data. To my knowledge, TOR does not record your activities since your internet access will go through 3-4 routers, or hops, prior to actually accessing the web.

On the other hand... In today's world, where "you should have nothing to hide", deviating from the norm may cause inquiries by LEA... :Not-Amused:;):Cool:

sarasharrock
03-28-2017, 12:17 PM
Just for historical content, this information was always being tracked and the ISPs had done various things with it like marketing things to you specifically or choosing to give certain people better access or so on. That is, a site could pay more to get faster access to its customers while those who didn't pay would get slower access..

Some of these went away with Net Neutrality where it was deemed that all traffic should be deemed the same and one vendor shouldn't get preferential treatment over another.

As far as protecting yourself, a VPN will help greatly in hiding your browsing..

Yes i am aware of the fact that marketing was done on the basis of these ads, and i believe Fb also keeps our browsing data and give it to advertisers who pay them for advertising campaigns.

So vpn seems a better option, for hiding our IP, although few still thinks that it is bogus, and your isp already has your IP!

"Your isp has your ip already! BUTT!!"
>But when you connect to your dedicated IP, they won't figure out the newer IP you are connected on
>If the sites use HTTPS, their domains can still be seen, but the data is generally encrypted.

sarasharrock
03-28-2017, 12:23 PM
There isn't really much you can do, once you access the Internet. Your ISP, VPN provider, etc., are free to monitor/record your adventures on the web. Both the ISP and the VPN provider can do this without you noticing it. Selling all the personal information and data to data brokers and/or advertisers directly is an additional revenue source that is hard to resists. Since businesses receive preferential treatments from the government, of course legalizing this behavior is preferred hence the introduction of the referenced bill.

With that said, there are certain measures that you can take to prevent the collection. You can use Opera with its built-in free VPN connection in tandem with DNSCrypt. The latter one encrypts all DNS queries and does not use the ISP's DNS server for lookup. Alternatively, you could also use the TOR browser with DNSCrypt. Even in these cases, ISP will know the IP for the VPN server, the first TOR node and for the DNSCrypt. But that's all they know. Please keep in mind that the exit nodes of the VPN can still record all your activities and sell your personal information and data. To my knowledge, TOR does not record your activities since your internet access will go through 3-4 routers, or hops, prior to actually accessing the web.

On the other hand... In today's world, where "you should have nothing to hide", deviating from the norm may cause inquiries by LEA... :Not-Amused:;):Cool:

hahaha you are just making me feel terrible! i am in search of VPNs who don't keep logs i mean atleast they should have enough integrity of not keeping logs if they are claiming it in their Privacy Policy! and allow bitcoing payments :) I came across few research on hiding your ip is possible (https://www.usavpn.com/how-to-hide-ip-address/) either with vpn or dedicated ip through vpn providers

i tried opera once i didnot like it much! as fiding extensions was never easy on it lol :Smirk:
and the other fact about opera is that it only holds about 1-2% of the overall market share of browsers today, which means when 99 out of 100 people are using something else, so i wanna stay with majority :D:Evil:

Cr00zng
03-28-2017, 02:55 PM
hahaha you are just making me feel terrible!
That was not my intent, sorry, but there's more...:Evil:


i am in search of VPNs who don't keep logs i mean atleast they should have enough integrity of not keeping logs if they are claiming it in their Privacy Policy! and allow bitcoing payments :) I came across few research on hiding your ip is possible (https://www.usavpn.com/how-to-hide-ip-address/) either with vpn or dedicated ip through vpn providers
Yes, there are VPN services for a fee that promise what you need to hear. In my view, the free one is just as good, but each of its own...

Apple, Google, Microsoft, etc., have their "Privacy Policies", but it doesn't mean much, it never did. Nowadays, the OS and apps all have built-in "call home features" that can negate the need to intercept your VPN connection in traffic. The OS built-in "telemetry" runs with system level access and some of the apps, especially security apps like antivirus, do as well. For these "features" the plain-text is available prior to being encrypted by SSL/VPN, etc., and sent over the network...


i tried opera once i didnot like it much! as fiding extensions was never easy on it lol :Smirk:
and the other fact about opera is that it only holds about 1-2% of the overall market share of browsers today, which means when 99 out of 100 people are using something else, so i wanna stay with majority :D:Evil:
About the market share...

Market share also suggest "mind share"... If "99 out of 100 people are using something", you bet your dupa that hackers will target that "something" the most.;D

I have four browsers on my system and each has a purpose. TOR is for general browsing the web, while Opera is more for forums and such since some forums block TOR access. The standard Firefox/IE/Safari browsers depending on the platform, are used for business related SSL connections. In all cases, DNSCrypt for address lookup...

harryb2448
03-28-2017, 04:15 PM
I have a much safer idea.

Sell your computer and stay off the 'net if you think you can stay in front!

Cr00zng
03-28-2017, 08:11 PM
It's a done deal, the bill is waiting for the President's signature:

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/03/for-sale-your-private-browsing-history/

RoseyDreamy
03-29-2017, 06:00 AM
Regarding Opera, since they use the Chrome engine most add-ons and such should work for it as well as most websites, although it isn't lightweight anymore like it was in the past.

Cr00zng
03-29-2017, 08:36 AM
Regarding Opera, since they use the Chrome engine most add-ons and such should work for it as well as most websites, although it isn't lightweight anymore like it was in the past.
My beef with Opera is the constant "call home" built-in feature, that makes it a heavy weight...

When the "opera.exe" started, it calls for the "launcher.exe":


system drive\users\uid\appdata\local\programs\opera\42.0. 2393.94\opera.exe" --type=renderer --alt-high-dpi-setting=96 --system-dpi-setting=96 --primordial-pipe-token"=caxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
system drive\users\uid\appdata\local\programs\opera\42.0. 2393.94\opera.exe" --launcher

*- Guess the purpose of the "primordinal-pipe-token"... My guess is telemetry reporting, or tracking in another word.

The launcher on the other hand executes other processes:


system drive\users\uid\appdata\local\programs\opera\42.0. 2393.94\opera_crashreporter.exe" --ran-launcher --crash-reporter-parent-id=1692
system drive\users\uid\appdata\local\programs\opera\42.0. 2393.137\opera_autoupdate.exe" --host --pipeid=oauc_task_pipexxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxx

When the browser closed, the launcher runs the crash reporter and the auto update again, prior to actually closing/exiting the browser.

In all fairness, other browsers, applications, etc., aren't that different from the Opera browser. As posted earlier, all of them have this "feature" of improving end user's experience. Collecting end users' information in the process is just icing on the cake that results in additional revenue sources for the company.

It still bites that the US congress approved the "no privacy for your internet service" bill. Makes you wonder, if it had been intended to increase the profitability of the ISP, or provide quick and hassle-free access to LEOs for checking on your internet activities. My guess is both.... :Confused::Angry:

PS: It's easier to analyze processes on Windows, than on the Mac, sorry. At least for me at this point....

lclev
03-29-2017, 10:39 AM
The idea you have privacy on the internet and what you do is private has gone the way of the dodo bird. It is an illusion the vast amount of everyday users believe. If you want proof - check out Facebook, Twitter, the multitude of forums to see what people will put out on the web naively believing in their own personal privacy or anonymity. VPN's are an attempt at a band aid.

My father was a lawyer and he told me at a very young age - NEVER put in writing anything you don't want to see again or have come back and bite you. He died before the internet grew into what it is today but his words certainly hold true - even more so today.

His second piece of advice? Never do, say, or write anything you would be ashamed of because no matter how well hidden it will surface someday - if not in this life, it will happen in the next.

Haven't you seen or read of someone losing a job because of a Facebook post? Just saying - nothing is private anymore.

Lisa

Sawday
03-29-2017, 12:05 PM
The US Government has decided to access all your data and browsing history 'for free'. Guess ISP's have decided that since it will all be out there for everyone to see (well at least the Russians, Wikileaks etc) then they might as well try to sell it while it's still worth something.

sarasharrock
03-29-2017, 12:06 PM
That was not my intent, sorry, but there's more...:Evil:


Yes, there are VPN services for a fee that promise what you need to hear. In my view, the free one is just as good, but each of its own...

Apple, Google, Microsoft, etc., have their "Privacy Policies", but it doesn't mean much, it never did. Nowadays, the OS and apps all have built-in "call home features" that can negate the need to intercept your VPN connection in traffic. The OS built-in "telemetry" runs with system level access and some of the apps, especially security apps like antivirus, do as well. For these "features" the plain-text is available prior to being encrypted by SSL/VPN, etc., and sent over the network...


About the market share...

Market share also suggest "mind share"... If "99 out of 100 people are using something", you bet your dupa that hackers will target that "something" the most.;D

I have four browsers on my system and each has a purpose. TOR is for general browsing the web, while Opera is more for forums and such since some forums block TOR access. The standard Firefox/IE/Safari browsers depending on the platform, are used for business related SSL connections. In all cases, DNSCrypt for address lookup...

Hahaha i got your point regarding the market share! but how can you say that privacy policy don't mean much! if they don't abide by it! they can get sue for it! Yes when i had android i used to use ! anti virus called kasperky maybe! and i loved it! anyways i will trying using so many browsers, starting off from internet explorer ;P

But your recommendation on free one is not good, i mean havn't you heard that saying which goes "There's no free lunch" why do they give is encryption of upto 256 bit for free? they are keeping logs and using it for their benefits. i believe and i hope any rational person would agree!

sarasharrock
03-29-2017, 12:09 PM
Yes i know, its done deal now guys, :(
now no use of spamming their fb pages!

sarasharrock
03-29-2017, 12:15 PM
The US Government has decided to access all your data and browsing history 'for free'. Guess ISP's have decided that since it will all be out there for everyone to see (well at least the Russians, Wikileaks etc) then they might as well try to sell it while it's still worth something.

haha ur location say, ur in UK you are safe :p for now!

Cr00zng
03-29-2017, 02:45 PM
The idea you have privacy on the internet and what you do is private has gone the way of the dodo bird. It is an illusion the vast amount of everyday users believe. If you want proof - check out Facebook, Twitter, the multitude of forums to see what people will put out on the web naively believing in their own personal privacy or anonymity. VPN's are an attempt at a band aid.

My father was a lawyer and he told me at a very young age - NEVER put in writing anything you don't want to see again or have come back and bite you. He died before the internet grew into what it is today but his words certainly hold true - even more so today.

His second piece of advice? Never do, say, or write anything you would be ashamed of because no matter how well hidden it will surface someday - if not in this life, it will happen in the next.

Haven't you seen or read of someone losing a job because of a Facebook post? Just saying - nothing is private anymore.

Lisa

While initially Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, etc., had been the pioneers in ruining your privacy, nowadays everyone is doing it. That includes applications and ISPs; the latter one had been doing this for awhile and the currently passed bill just legalizing selling your information. You could not use Google, etc., but there's no choice with your ISP even if you don't put anything in writing. ;)

The HR35 bill effectively evens the data collection field. Microsoft did had the advantage up to this point in the data collection, with their Windows 10 and retro-fitting W7 and 8.x with the same. This bill, if anything, it gives advantage for the ISPs with their unfettered insight in to your internet access and all other personal information. The said part is that you pay the ISP to collect and sell your information. But don't feel bad, my circumstances are the same... :'(

Slydude
03-29-2017, 03:03 PM
Some variation of this has been going on even before the Internet.

Some of us remember when snail mail was king. Every time you changed addresses you went to the post office and filled out a change of address card to have mail forwarded to the new address. In short order you were not only receiving the junk mail you used to get, but new junk mail addressed to you at the new place. IIRC part of the problem was that the postal service was allowed to pass the change of address list on to bulk mail customers -- for a fee of course. See Here (http://www.nytimes.com/1992/05/14/us/post-office-criticized-for-opening-its-address-list.html)

Note the catch 22 mentioned in the article: Completing the form means you give them permission to do so while not completing the form means they won't/cannot forward your mail.

Cr00zng
03-29-2017, 04:09 PM
Hahaha i got your point regarding the market share! but how can you say that privacy policy don't mean much! if they don't abide by it! they can get sue for it! Yes when i had android i used to use ! anti virus called kasperky maybe! and i loved it! anyways i will trying using so many browsers, starting off from internet explorer ;P
The privacy policy covers the covers the company that in legal language basically states, that the company owes your data and can do anything that it wants with the information about you. Kaspersky is even worse than most companies nowadays. Their AV solution has a built-in SSL/TLS proxy that's invisible by installing their certificate. The cert allows Kaspersky to access the the encrypted content in plain text. It's operation is very similar to BlueCoat ProxyAG. Except the ProxySG will warn end users that the content of the SSL/TLS connection is being inspected and logged by BlueCoat. Kaspersky does not give this warning to the end users.


But your recommendation on free one is not good, i mean havn't you heard that saying which goes "There's no free lunch" why do they give is encryption of upto 256 bit for free? they are keeping logs and using it for their benefits. i believe and i hope any rational person would agree!

I did, but just because you pay for the service does not mean the service is better. For my needs, general browsing the web via TOR browser for fee is fine.

For example, currently I am connect to this forum from:

26256

The "This browser" is the TOR browser and the "Internet" is the actual website I've connected to; in this case the mac-forums.com.

Others are routers or hops in the circuits. The first router knows my public IP address, but the second or third one does not. the second router knows the IP of the first and third routers IPs. The third routers knows the second routers IP and the actual web site address. The web site on the other hand only know the third router's IP. And yes, the connection between each hops are encrypted with different encryption keys.

Yesterday, my connection might have been as such:

26257

Some sites block access for TOR exit nodes (the last router), in which case I can just ask for a new circuit that results in a new exit node IP.

Here's the question, what's the country of origin in these circuits? The best you can do is guess...

While I do know that there are cracks for the the TOR networks, it's a tall order for search engines, websites, advertisement companies, etc., to track you on the fly.

sarasharrock
03-31-2017, 10:27 AM
Wow lisa your dad was a laywer! and what he said than was very deep! Even now when i see my fb memories, i feel how stupid i was :p

S.SubZero
04-02-2017, 08:32 PM
I love the utter paranoia and fear over this. I think it's mostly cuz of Trump, and there's an overwhelming need to loathe and despise him and everything he does, so here's just another thing.

The first thing to keep in mind here, is that NOTHING CHANGED. You might think that *now* the ISPs are welcome to sell your data at will, but fun fact: they were allowed to yesterday, and last week, and last month, and last year. The FCC rules were not in effect yet. They weren't slated to be until later this year, and there wasn't even a firm date on that yet.

The second thing is that it only applied to ISPs. Google and Facebook for example, who aren't ISPs, were not lumped into this. The ISPs argued before that they were being unfairly targetted by rules ONLY applying to them.

As well, Comcast, Verizon, and others have already publicly stated that they have no intention of selling any more data than they already do (because the rule never included ALL data, just highly sensitive stuff).

lclev
04-02-2017, 09:59 PM
I love the utter paranoia and fear over this. I think it's mostly cuz of Trump, and there's an overwhelming need to loathe and despise him and everything he does, so here's just another thing.

I don't fear or have any paranoia over this recent development. And for the record, I don't loathe or despise Trump at all. I just resent the tracking of all I do although I am aware privacy is fastly disappearing. I do resent this recent new law of letting providers sell what I do on the internet and sell it to some advertiser who can analyze my data and target me. I am aware it has been going on and that some companies are saying they don't do it but each year companies chip away at what they will and won't do.

Not paranoia just tired of the lack of privacy we have today.

Lisa

chscag
04-02-2017, 10:09 PM
Not paranoia just tired of the lack of privacy we have today.

You would think that young folks today to be more aware of this than folks our age, but the opposite is true. Nowadays, they think nothing of putting their private photos and whatever else they're doing up on the net for the whole world to see.

sarasharrock
04-03-2017, 09:20 AM
Guys what's the new status about this news? have they legalized and let isps sell our data or is there someone re-appealing that matter!

sarasharrock
04-03-2017, 09:22 AM
i think people are going off the topic! what to do with our privacy! about my family's privacy! i am being very economical and budget friendly!
some1 suggested me Ivacy as its the cheapest! and someone said Expressvpn i know its gud but hell expensive :s
here's the update though on the matter
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/gop-congress-rolls-back-rules-hunting-broadband-privacy-46523108

lclev
04-03-2017, 11:03 AM
I believe this article says it better: https://www.yahoo.com/tech/isps-now-sell-private-data-152003886.html
The article says that supposedly you will be able to opt out of data collection if you contact your provider.

sarasharrock for those of us who have been around for a while, we have seen the steady chipping away of our privacy - and freedoms. It is like the frog in the pot of water. All is great for the frog until the water is heated to a temperature that begins to cook the frog. This is what I see happening today. What to me is so sad is how younger people don't realize what is happening or what they are missing. The internet has opened a whole new level of exploitation. People - young and old - assume a level of privacy that does not exist on the internet. This latest news ISPs selling information is just another upping of the heat of the water. :Smirk:

I do not believe the president has signed the final bill yet though.

Lisa

IWT
04-05-2017, 06:49 PM
You would think that young folks today to be more aware of this than folks our age, but the opposite is true. Nowadays, they think nothing of putting their private photos and whatever else they're doing up on the net for the whole world to see.

This is so true.

I am shy of commenting on US practices, so I'll stick with the UK.

People a third of my age (and younger; gosh I must be getting on a bit) will happily post on Facebook their birthday party celebrations along with "I'm 30 already...oh me oh my...". Okay, so now I know your Birth Day (today) and your Date of Birth because you're 30.

And look, there's a picture of your BMW with its Registration Number as clear as daylight - parked nicely in front of your house (can I just make out the number on the door?). And your dog's called Floppy (bet that's one of your passwords). And there's baby Felix and older sister Josie.

Go back in their Timeline - astonishing what they see fit to post - club memberships, hobbies, wedding day......and so forth. No need to go on. Challenge them - "don't see the problem, man!"

Ian

lclev
04-06-2017, 01:30 PM
Challenge them - "don't see the problem, man!" Ian

Until they have their identity stolen. At which time they are totally amazed followed by the quote: "I don't understand, I didn't do anything and am always careful." Right....

Lisa

willieaames
04-10-2017, 09:05 AM
The US Government just reverted back to the pre-Obama privacy laws, allowing ISPs to track & sell our web histories. Since you are on their network they basically have more information on you than your own parents. ISPs technically know your address, phone numbers, emails, chat IDs, Skype IDs, banking information and everything else there is to know about you. And itís not just you, your family, friends, parents and colleagues are all there too.

Cr00zng
04-10-2017, 07:34 PM
The US Government just reverted back to the pre-Obama privacy laws, allowing ISPs to track & sell our web histories. Since you are on their network they basically have more information on you than your own parents. ISPs technically know your address, phone numbers, emails, chat IDs, Skype IDs, banking information and everything else there is to know about you. * And itís not just you, your family, friends, parents and colleagues are all there too.

*-emphasis mine

That's not entirely true...

First of all, the only thing that changed from the ISPs' perspective is that the stricter FCC privacy rule, that would have become effective late in this fall, had been repealed. In another word, the law did not change anything... as of yet. That means the ISPs operate the same way as they've been doing all along.

Second of all, you can retrieve your email securely, even from your ISP's emaill account through SSL/TLS connection. Not much use on your home desktop since the ISP hosts the email server and has access to all of your emails there. Both Skype and banking information are TLS/SSL connection by default, don't know about chat programs, but the chances are that they use SSL/TLS as well. If your ISP utilizes SSL/TLS proxy, or requires the acceptance as such, you should cancel your ISP services. I know I would...

Yes, the ISP will know that you connected to Skype, your bank, etc., but does not know the content. You can use VPN tunnel, Tor, etc., for hiding these addresses, but the ISP still going to get them. Most people use the DHCP settings for their ISP connection, that assigns the address for the DNS servers. The ISP can collect the logs from the DNS server and know the websites you asked the address for and you visited. Using DNSCrypt would eliminate the ISP DNS server footprint for your internet access. The only thing the ISP would know that you've connected to the VPN server address and/or the first Tor node. No other addresses/websites would be visible to them...

You really need to know how the ISP connection works in order to minimize your browser's footprint left behind in their logs. And that's the best you can do, minimize...

Cr00zng
04-10-2017, 07:58 PM
Posting the response above, this is how my Tor circuit looks like:

26318

Every time I open the Tor browser, it is a different circuit. Yes, I admit that I live in the Ukraine... today... :Smirk: :) :Evil:

And here's the DNSCrypt proxy running on my system:

26319

The only thing the ISP sees is with this session, I've connected to 163.172.157.213. Do they know that it is a Tor node? Of course they do, but that's all...

PS: I am not a hacker, just fed up with everyone is trying to collect my browsing habits, display loads of ads, etc. I have not used my Tor browser for connecting to ".onion" address as of yet, just regular .com, .net, .org, etc., addresses...

harryb2448
04-10-2017, 09:22 PM
Well just to scare you Facebook sells on all your information.

ian.wright
04-13-2017, 06:47 AM
Don't Panic.

Check with your ISP to find out what their privacy policy is and whether they have an opt-out plan for personal and browsing data. If they have an opt-out plan, then take that and you'd just don't have to worry about it.

If they don't have an opt-out plan, or if their privacy plan says something like "we may share your browsing history with our marketing partners," then you have to decide whether this really is an issue. And now, you can decide whether you need a VPN or to use some other method to preserve your privacy.

And for a recommendation, I'm personally using PureVPN for MAC (https://www.purevpn.com/vpn-software-for-mac.php) and it has been 2 years since I got it. Works fine for me, has all the required features of which internet kill switch, split tunneling and DNS leak protection are of most use for me. I also love their chrome app, blocks all the useless ads and malware coming through the browser.

sarasharrock
04-21-2017, 10:12 AM
Well harryb i am aware of the fact that facebook along with google already shares and keep all our browsing activity and our queries that we do, so that they can sell us the right product. Also have you heard about Prism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRISM_(surveillance_program)) is a program to monitor our activity backed by NSA, Google and likes of other tech giants so we are not safe thats for sure. But as long as they keep our activity only to sell us right dresses and sandles i have no issues but if they are even reading conversations and keeping track of checkins, GPS tag and all like happening in Australia for Meta Data than i think using mac vpn (https://www.usavpn.com/best-vpn-for-mac/) would be very ok.

@IanWright no we are not panicking, i am just wondering are we really tax paying citizen, and right companies can do whatever they like and government doesn't take anyone's consideration.

harryb2448
04-21-2017, 05:21 PM
Sarah there is a thread on here about new Samsung TV's recording viewers comments and sending back ton the mother ship!

harryb2448
04-21-2017, 05:23 PM
Sarah there is a thread on here about new Samsung TV's recording viewers comments and sending back to the mother ship! This is really scartey:-


http://www.mac-forums.com/schweb-s-lounge/339486-dont-discuss-personal-information-front-smart-tvs.html?highlight=Samsung