PDA

View Full Version : Is iCloud vulnerability to hacking as easy as this article suggests?



IWT
11-02-2016, 08:42 AM
The title says it all, really.

The Linked article outlines in some detail how apparently easy it is to access and download someone's iCloud Account and details:

http://mashable.com/2014/09/04/i-hacked-my-own-icloud-account/#oB4KrbCkukq2

Even if there is an element of exaggeration, or journalistic one-upmanship, it does seem worrying.

Ian

lclev
11-02-2016, 10:06 AM
Well thanks for finding that little gem Ian! :Smirk:

You still have to have some information about the person and be able to figure out the password. So many people put too much of their personal information out there and then pick simple passwords. Add to that they fall for phishing emails and click on everything they find and fill out online forms for all the "free" stuff. I have a hard time feeling sorry for those types.

But as the article says - an account can be hacked through the use of the app (someone is making money $$). I realize some purposes for the app are legit too.

The problem is the more security features any cloud service adds to make accessing a user's files more difficult for the hacker, the more trouble it is for the average user to access them too. And the more the hassle for the user, the less they use it or they drop it. So it is a hard line to walk for Apple.

Lisa

chscag
11-02-2016, 03:17 PM
So it is a hard line to walk for Apple.

Amen to that. Just look at how messed up Apple's 2FA is. And now in Sierra we're supposed to store everything in the cloud?

harryb2448
11-02-2016, 05:20 PM
Well you guys can but not this little duck. I am shocked, shocked I say, chscag that you would store anything in the cloud. Just wait until Donald gets his Russion mate Vladimir hacking the cloud!

Cr00zng
11-17-2016, 09:04 AM
Cloud is just another tool for your computing needs and just like any other tools, use it wisely. End user should make a choice what data is uploaded to where, instead of pointing at cloud's for fault. Some of the cloud services complies with regulations, such as HIPAA in the US, while other are do not. In either case, protecting one's data with easily guessable password is no different from having local user account, email, etc., password as "12345" or worse. That's not on the cloud, it is on the end user.

I do use clouds since it is nearly impossible nowadays not to. But I am selective with clouds and the data that ends up there.

Putin probably knows less about hacking than you and I... :)