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View Full Version : Finding Aperture images on Timemachine to export?



MacLover2011
12-18-2015, 07:28 AM
Hello everyone,
How do I find my images in the Aperture library on my external hard drive within Time Machine so I can export them into a newer OS X format on my new Hard Drive? Is it an easy process? I am hoping to start a clean install on the new hard drive and just pick and choose from Time Machine what I want to use.
Thanks for your help.

chscag
12-18-2015, 03:45 PM
Provided you successfully made backups using Time Machine on the old hard drive, it should be easy enough to import the Aperture Library to your new hard drive. I don't know if you can import certain images that are in the library rather than the entire library. If you have to import the entire library, you can always remove those images from it that you don't want after the import.

Now, the question is... are you familiar with Time Machine and know how to restore from it?

MacLover2011
12-20-2015, 10:27 AM
Provided you successfully made backups using Time Machine on the old hard drive, it should be easy enough to import the Aperture Library to your new hard drive. I don't know if you can import certain images that are in the library rather than the entire library. If you have to import the entire library, you can always remove those images from it that you don't want after the import.

Now, the question is... are you familiar with Time Machine and know how to restore from it?

Thanks for the reply. An Apple Rep went over getting files off of TimeMachine to my computer. However, he went over some read/write steps within the Get Info tool that I never thought about.
Time Machine did an entire new back up and no longer has any room. There is only one back up now and all the others are gone. Since I did not delete anything from my hard drive I am hoping I don't have to worry about lost data.
I want to migrate some files from one Time Machine back up hard drive to another. However, my external hard drives are prohibiting me from doing so.

RavingMac
12-20-2015, 02:44 PM
Time Machine has its place, but IMO everyone should have a cloned back up of their HD. Do yourself a big favor:

1) Buy an external USB HD (1TB drives were ~$60 USD the last time I checked)
2) Get Carbon Copy Clone (CCC) or Super Duper to make a bootable clone of your internal Mac HD
3) Clone the drive, test it, and then stow it away someplace for safe keeping
4) Once a month (or more often if you wish) dig it out and update the clone

Doing the above can save you all sorts of headache and heartache down the road

MacLover2011
12-21-2015, 10:48 AM
Time Machine has its place, but IMO everyone should have a cloned back up of their HD. Do yourself a big favor:

1) Buy an external USB HD (1TB drives were ~$60 USD the last time I checked)
2) Get Carbon Copy Clone (CCC) or Super Duper to make a bootable clone of your internal Mac HD
3) Clone the drive, test it, and then stow it away someplace for safe keeping
4) Once a month (or more often if you wish) dig it out and update the clone

Doing the above can save you all sorts of headache and heartache down the road

Thanks for the information. I will try that.
I did think that TimeMachine was already making a clone. Still learning. :)

BrianMinn
09-27-2016, 09:12 PM
I make regular Time Machine backups (to several different drives). Twice in the past I had to erase my laptop drive and was able to use TM to reload the laptop, and had no problem with the recovery.

What problems do you foresee with TM that requires a completely different system for restoration?

IWT
09-28-2016, 09:12 AM
I make regular Time Machine backups (to several different drives). Twice in the past I had to erase my laptop drive and was able to use TM to reload the laptop, and had no problem with the recovery.

What problems do you foresee with TM that requires a completely different system for restoration?

This is a rather old thread, but I'll try yo answer your question.

Time Machine (TM) is a free, easy to use app, on all Macs which backs up your Hard Disk Drive, hourly, then weekly, then monthly; as you already know. It is excellent for retrieving an accidentally deleted file or app. It can, as you say, be used to restore to a new Mac either directly or via Migration Assistant (MA). But it is not bootable.

So, if your HDD fails, you have to wait till you get a replacement.

Cloning Software like Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) or SuperDuper! (SD!) makes an exact copy (clone) of your HDD which is bootable. So, if your HDD fails, you can usually reboot from your clone and carry on working, finish your project and so on. You can clone back to a new Mac or HDD.

The two methods of BU are complementary rather than either or. Most Forum users would probably endorse the concept of having both because, whilst overlapping in terms of BU, each works in a different way as indicated above.

The third strand to a BU strategy is having an off-site BU of which there are many variants, mostly using "the cloud".

Hope that helps.

Ian

BrianMinn
09-28-2016, 05:51 PM
Thanks for the info!

Brian