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plumpjack
10-19-2015, 04:16 PM
Can anyone help? I've been getting the above warning whenever I use Safari 5.1 [I'm on 10.6.8]. I can access Google or perhaps Reddit but eBay, Amazon and almost every other page I get "ERROR: You're still using a legacy immunicity PAC file".

What do these interruptions mean and what do I do? It wants me to uncheck automatic proxy settings in Chrome and Firefox. I don't have Chrome though I do use Aviator. I also use Firefox. There is no mention of Safari, my preferred default, but the message here is for Macs generally. Since I browse the web unrestricted using either of the other two I'm reluctant to change anything. It's all worked perfectly well to up to two days ago and is clearly doing so still to some extent. It's just Safari.

UPDATE: Aviator is now playing up and Firefox can't open web pages. I could really use some help on this please. Here's what I get:-

__________________________________________________ _______________________________________

ERROR: You're still using a legacy immunicity PAC file

(Immunicity was seized by the UK Police in August 2014!)

You tried to access the URL http://www.ebay.co.uk/

Since August 2014 the UK City of London Police's Intellectual Property Unit has had control of the immunicity.org domain.

In theory they could have intercepted and logged every URL you have visted, they could have proxied your connections and evesdropped on what you were doing!

But there's no need to panic, in August of 2015 the immunicity.org domain was taken from PIPCU by a UK anti-censorship activist group

In the meantime you should disable your PAC file usage and consider using the Tor Browser instead

How to Disable The Legacy Immunicity PAC File

Internet Explorer
Go to Start then Control Panel. (Windows 8 users hover your mouse to the bottom right, click Settings, then click Control Panel)
Find Internet Options (sometimes under Network and Internet), then go to the Connections tab.
At the bottom, click the LAN settings button.
A new dialog will appear.UNtick the box that says Use automatic configuration script.
Press OK, then OK on the Internet Options dialog.

Chrome
In Google Chrome, click the menu button to the right of the URL bar, and choose Settings.
At the bottom, click the Show advanced settings
Under Network, click Change proxy settings.
On Windows, at the bottom click the LAN settings button. A new dialog will appear. UNtick the box that says Use automatic configuration script.
On Mac OS X, UNtick Automatic Proxy Configuration.
On Linux, click Network proxy, DEselect Automatic from the Method drop down menu.
Close the dialogs to save the settings. On Mac OS X, press Apply first.

Firefox
In Mozilla Firefox, go to Options. In Windows, click the Firefox button then choose Options, or go to Tools, then Options. In Mac OS X, go to Firefox, then Preferences. In Linux, go to Tools, Options.
Go to the Advanced tab, then go to the Network tab.
Click Settings next to Configure how Firefox connects to the Internet.
Select 'No proxy'
Press OK, then OK on the Options dialog.
As always; The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.

Generated Mon, 19 Oct 2015 00:35:10 GMT by exit01.brasshorncommunications.uk (squid/3.1.23)

__________________________________________________ _______________________________________

Does anyone recognize what this is? It's driving me up the wall. I posted a similar message on another forum but got no response at all, which suggests it's a local problem rather than anything more sinister or you'd be hearing complaints all across cyberspace.

Thanks.

chas_m
10-19-2015, 04:24 PM
This is malware you picked up long ago. Download and use MalwareBytes (free) to remove it. And avoid dodgy sites or installing things you didn't specifically ask for.

And update your OS. This is just the tip of the iceberg of the security nightmare you're wide open for. Snow Leopard hasn't had a security update in at least a year.

plumpjack
10-19-2015, 04:43 PM
This is malware you picked up long ago. Download and use MalwareBytes (free) to remove it. And avoid dodgy sites or installing things you didn't specifically ask for.

And update your OS. This is just the tip of the iceberg of the security nightmare you're wide open for. Snow Leopard hasn't had a security update in at least a year.

Crikey that's a bit of a chastening response! I'm grateful you've thrown a bit of light on this for me. My OS and browsers have certainly been more temperamental of late but this is the first time I've suffered continual interruptions that prevent me accessing the web. I thought about re-installing SL. I may take things further in view of what you've told me.

You're absolutely sure it's malware and not a malfunctioning browser? It's weird that it let's you access certain sites and not 95% of others. But it's affecting my other browsers now so perhaps that alone points to your being right.

EDIT: - MalwareBytes may be free but it requires 10.7 minimum.

chas_m
10-19-2015, 04:45 PM
Immunicity -- some kind of pretend "anti-virus" that was not included with any Mac or other browser download.

PAC file -- something you shouldn't be using.

So yes.

plumpjack
10-19-2015, 05:00 PM
Yep. 10.7 or higher MalwareBytes, so I'm snookered anyway. Maybe I'll just reinstall and stay away from those shark-infested football streaming sites, which is where I'm fairly sure I picked this up. Thanks again Chas_m.

chas_m
10-19-2015, 05:07 PM
I'd suggest a clean install of 10.6.8 from your original disks, then a prompt upgrade to El Capitan if you have 4GB or more of RAM. If you don't, step 2 would be to upgrade the RAM (preferably to 8GB if feasible). Step three would be to update all your software as best you can, then jump to El Capitan, and be aware that any PPC-era software is not going to work, and lots of things are going to need an update again (mostly free, some older stuff might need a paid upgrade).

As a rule of thumb, it's okay to "lag" a year -- maybe even two -- behind the latest OS version, but no more than that or you are asking for problems. If your machine is so old it can't even run the two-year-old version of OS X, it's time to start thinking about new(er) machine.

plumpjack
10-19-2015, 06:12 PM
I'd suggest a clean install of 10.6.8 from your original disks, then a prompt upgrade to El Capitan if you have 4GB or more of RAM. If you don't, step 2 would be to upgrade the RAM (preferably to 8GB if feasible). Step three would be to update all your software as best you can, then jump to El Capitan, and be aware that any PPC-era software is not going to work, and lots of things are going to need an update again (mostly free, some older stuff might need a paid upgrade).

As a rule of thumb, it's okay to "lag" a year -- maybe even two -- behind the latest OS version, but no more than that or you are asking for problems. If your machine is so old it can't even run the two-year-old version of OS X, it's time to start thinking about new(er) machine.


Thanks. Is it necessary to wipe the drive with Disk Utility before formatting and reinstalling or can I skip that without leaving the installation a bit shaky? I was told it was better to wipe the drive first but I've never done it before. Also my boot drive's 1.5TB. Wiping it would take quite a while.

chas_m
10-20-2015, 02:46 AM
Normally I would say just install over the top, but because you are making a HUGE jump, it might be best to do a "clean install." For that, it would really be best to let a professional handle it -- because you are so very far behind, it's quite tricky to instruct you on how to make a bootable El Capitan installer (I don't think any of the "easy" ways go back to a system that old), so best to let a tech do it for you. If there's an Apple Store near you, they will likely do it for free or a modest charge.

plumpjack
10-20-2015, 06:33 AM
Normally I would say just install over the top, but because you are making a HUGE jump, it might be best to do a "clean install." For that, it would really be best to let a professional handle it -- because you are so very far behind, it's quite tricky to instruct you on how to make a bootable El Capitan installer (I don't think any of the "easy" ways go back to a system that old), so best to let a tech do it for you. If there's an Apple Store near you, they will likely do it for free or a modest charge.

Looks like I'm on my own then. I'm housebound. There isn't the slightest chance of getting to an Apple store. Maybe it'll broaden my knowledge just to take the plunge. Who knows? You learn by doing in many ways. You've been very helpful. Thanks.

harryb2448
10-20-2015, 05:56 PM
Jack Apple Online UK sells the Snow Leopard OS X.6 DVD for 14.99 with postage.

Here is the link:-


http://www.apple.com/uk/shop/product/MC573Z/A/mac-os-x-106-snow-leopard

plumpjack
10-20-2015, 06:38 PM
Jack Apple Online UK sells the Snow Leopard OS X.6 DVD for 14.99 with postage.

Here is the link:-


http://www.apple.com/uk/shop/product/MC573Z/A/mac-os-x-106-snow-leopard

Thanks Harry. Appreciate the tip.

MacInWin
10-20-2015, 10:44 PM
And don't miss the tip that chas_m gave about the fact that PPC software will not run under a new version of OS X. Between your version and now Apple dropped Rosetta, which allowed PPC versions to run in Intel machines. So if you have old software, look into updates before you move past OS X 10.6.8. You SHOULD move, but plan it carefully so you don't lose apps all over the place.

If you are housebound, is there a friend you trust well enough to take your system to an Apple store for you? If not, the process isn't that bad, but I'll say the most important step is BACKUP, then test the backup to make sure it is really a backup. And update all your applications as far as you can before you backup and start the installation as they will help (some) with them running after the upgrade. You'll probably still have to update some of them more after the upgrade, but doing so before the upgrade should lessen the shock.

pm-r
10-21-2015, 12:03 AM
If I may, I dare say there may be a bit of an overreaction on some advice here and maybe some other checking and solutions may be in order, like:
https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7290562?start=0&tstart=0
or do another search for some alternatives:
https://www.google.ca/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=Mac+Disable+The+Legacy+Immunicity+PAC+File&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&gfe_rd=cr&ei=h_4mVoDvE8_AoAS0yLiADg

And FWIW: Apple is still supplying the xprotect updates for OS X 10.6.8 SL users.

plumpjack
10-21-2015, 04:57 AM
Ooops. Sorry.

plumpjack
10-21-2015, 04:59 AM
And don't miss the tip that chas_m gave about the fact that PPC software will not run under a new version of OS X. Between your version and now Apple dropped Rosetta, which allowed PPC versions to run in Intel machines. So if you have old software, look into updates before you move past OS X 10.6.8. You SHOULD move, but plan it carefully so you don't lose apps all over the place.

If you are housebound, is there a friend you trust well enough to take your system to an Apple store for you? If not, the process isn't that bad, but I'll say the most important step is BACKUP, then test the backup to make sure it is really a backup. And update all your applications as far as you can before you backup and start the installation as they will help (some) with them running after the upgrade. You'll probably still have to update some of them more after the upgrade, but doing so before the upgrade should lessen the shock.

Yes Apple discontinued Rosetta after 10.6.8 as far as I know. Thank you for taking time to post. I appreciate your advice.

plumpjack
10-21-2015, 05:00 AM
If I may, I dare say there may be a bit of an overreaction on some advice here and maybe some other checking and solutions may be in order, like:
https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7290562?start=0&tstart=0
or do another search for some alternatives:
https://www.google.ca/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=Mac+Disable+The+Legacy+Immunicity+PAC+File&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&gfe_rd=cr&ei=h_4mVoDvE8_AoAS0yLiADg

And FWIW: Apple is still supplying the xprotect updates for OS X 10.6.8 SL users.


Linc Davies on Apple is very knowledgeable. The post he's replying to has been posted elsewhere on the web. It's the only other one I've seen in relation to this nuisance and it comes on exactly the same date [more or less] I started having trouble. Unfortunately however he just repeats the PAC file warning instructions in disabling the proxy settings. I knew how to do that from what was in front of me. Oh and he's right - disabling proxy settings does indeed prevent web access. I had to put mine back.

Your Google link is to my own post on another site [or a condensed version of it].

It certainly behaves oddly for malware. Perhaps the malware is itself infected :). Web access is restored if I leave Safari alone for a few hours. The problems I was having with Aviator also seem to have vanished, at least for now. The instability kicks in again with Safari if I restart he computer but it settles down once more after a while [Safari has been dropping webpages or randomly failing to open them on and off for a while now]. There seems no consistency. If it was intended to block access maliciously why let me into eBay or my local cricket club?

UPDATE: Have tried the Linc Davies proxy advice a second time and it seems to have worked. It stopped web access again but unlike last time [I'm a bit thick you see] I restarted the browser, and this appears to have done the trick. For now...... :)

Thanks pm-r and everyone.

pm-r
10-21-2015, 01:37 PM
I'm not sure if you mentioned it or if you tried or if it will help, but did you try any of the manual removal stuff from the older Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Mac via:
http://www.thesafemac.com/arg/

I was also going to mention if the trouble might have something to do with your DNS settings you might want to change, and/or what happens if you try browsing after booting up using Safe Boot Mode.

But it sounds like you may have found a solution.

plumpjack
10-21-2015, 02:26 PM
I'm not sure if you mentioned it or if you tried or if it will help, but did you try any of the manual removal stuff from the older Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Mac via:
http://www.thesafemac.com/arg/

I was also going to mention if the trouble might have something to do with your DNS settings you might want to change, and/or what happens if you try browsing after booting up using Safe Boot Mode.

But it sounds like you may have found a solution.

I haven't tried these alternatives. You might be right though. This certainly doesn't behave like any malware I'm aware of [admittedly that isn't saying much]. From the outset it seemed more of a wobble in the system to me, mainly because it's been responding eccentrically for some time now [Safari failing to open web pages and so forth[. It's four trouble-free years since I hired someone to this set up after it began dropping he internet connection. I assume the chap who did it set the automatic proxy selection himself when installing the router and choosing DNS settings. I'd be surprised if a bug's somehow manipulated the internals to force my hand in this way, but that's the problem with ignorance. I wouldn't know where to begin with DNS or anything else quite frankly. I used to read about aspects of computing. I'd try to learn but it's very hard for me these days with a memory impaired by several deteriorating medical conditions. What stuff I did manage to absorb has gone forever. Still, every day an adventure.