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Jonzjob
07-18-2015, 12:32 PM
Well, this should be interesting to police? Will you wipe your copies for your own use?

Copying CDs and DVDs for yourself is now illegal again - ITV News (http://www.itv.com/news/2015-07-17/copying-cds-and-dvds-for-yourself-is-now-illegal-again/)

Nighthawk4
07-18-2015, 01:36 PM
Even worse if you have Apple Match :Smirk:

chscag
07-18-2015, 02:54 PM
Well, this should be interesting to police? Will you wipe your copies for your own use?

Copying CDs and DVDs for yourself is now illegal again - ITV News (http://www.itv.com/news/2015-07-17/copying-cds-and-dvds-for-yourself-is-now-illegal-again/)

Almost impossible to enforce. Same as here in the US.... Better put a piece a tape over your iSight camera. ;P

vansmith
07-18-2015, 03:10 PM
Legislation against format shifting is over zealous legislating based on irrational fears that this somehow leads to stealing. Consequently, it's about criminalizing behaviour before it becomes criminal ("surely you'll be a criminal if you do it so we'll prevent you from doing it").

It seems like copyright legislation all over the world has become more restrictive in its enforcement. Here, thankfully, format shifting was legalized in the Copyright Act but Canada has some of the most restrictive laws on DRM circumvention in the world. In other words, we can format shift all we want unless it isn't wrapped in DRM (which most stuff seems to be these days). There's a logic in there somewhere...

pm-r
07-18-2015, 04:54 PM
Just a wee bit out of touch isn't such a ruling considering that very little content is even sold on CD or DVD these days, and even the media players are becoming an optional device that needs to be purchased and connected somehow to even use the disks.

vansmith
07-18-2015, 06:00 PM
Just a wee bit out of touch isn't such a ruling considering that very little content is even sold on CD or DVD these days, and even the media players are becoming an optional device that needs to be purchased and connected somehow to even use the disks.I'm sure the law is more general than that and refers to one's (in)ability to copy copyrighted content for personal use. ;)

Slydude
07-18-2015, 10:15 PM
I'm sure the law is more general than that and refers to one's (in)ability to copy copyrighted content for personal use. ;)

I'd bet you're right. If the law doesn't already apply to content formats other than CD/DVD to on't going t take much of a lawyer to successfully argue that it should apply to all formats because the intent is to prevent such behavior.

harryb2448
07-19-2015, 02:10 AM
Don't panic think British Police will have much more pressing problems than some old judge's ruling which no doubt will be appealed.

vansmith
07-19-2015, 11:07 AM
I'd bet you're right. If the law doesn't already apply to content formats other than CD/DVD to on't going t take much of a lawyer to successfully argue that it should apply to all formats because the intent is to prevent such behavior.Ah yes, the ol' "intent" or "spirit" of the law argument.


Don't panic think British Police will have much more pressing problems than some old judge's ruling which no doubt will be appealed.It probably will but there is precedent (at least international). You'd be able to better speak to this Harry but is it not the case that you're allowed to format shift in Australia but not rip DVDs? I think the key here is that you can't circumvent DRM which is probably what this law is trying to reaffirm (although with unnecessary zeal).

harryb2448
07-20-2015, 08:05 PM
One would guess the case was brought about by the musicians and performing artists unions, authors and art groups against folk burning CDs and distributing amongst friends and for amatuer DJs and Karaoke hosts copying music to disc and using at wedding receptions, amatuer nights, birthday parties etc. It has amazed me living in a seniors residential facility how much copying of movie CDs goes on after folk hire from a 'video' store or purchase their own movie. The copies are circulated amongst friends or used at 'movie nights' in a community centre, all against the original concept of copyright.

If one were performing something was entitled to do, copying older Mac Operating Systems strictly for one's own use, or burning digital download operating systems to a thumb drive, this may well be outside the court's considerations.

One can understand musicians, artists, authors etc being concerned about the illegal copying of their material, as it is after all their livelihood. Ask chas m about his views on his copyright material!


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-09/kohler-its-not-all-stream-ahead-for-the-music-industry/5010718

Exodist
08-05-2015, 06:37 AM
Copyright laws are only effective at stoping law biding citizens.. Just like locks on a door, only keeps the honest people out. :-/

That said, I thought at least in the US you was allowed to make you legal data backup of any media you physically owned?

That said, the the media tycoons really want to stop or take the wind out of pirating. Then quit charging so dang much for DVD's and CD's.. They created this issue by being so greedy.. I buy all my music from iTunes now, just because I feel $9.99 for a music CD is a fair deal. So why are CD disc at best buy still 19.99 or 24.99.. That disc only cost a freaking nickel for crying out loud.. Movies cost also should be slashed in half. IMHO...

chas_m
08-05-2015, 06:51 AM
That said, I thought at least in the US you was allowed to make you legal data backup of any media you physically owned?

Lots of people think that, but the text of the DMCA makes it very clear they are mistaken. There have been a few holes poked in the DMCA over the years, but anything copy-protected cannot, by law, be circumvented for any reason whatsoever: not for backup, not for academic use, not for commentary, nor any other reason.

This is of course ridiculous, and until the Conservatives got into power Canada was in most areas much more sensible about the concept of personal use. Thanks, Harper ...

I can't comment on the UK laws because I haven't seen them, but this sort of thing generally backfires eventually, either by creating a market for pirated stuff or methods to circumvent the DRM/copy protection, or by consumers eventually bringing pressure to bear when the silliness of it eventually finds a case that embodies it ("Mom sentenced to 99 years for copying Scooby-Doo DVDs so her kids wouldn't keep destroying the paid-for originals," et al).

XJ-linux
08-06-2015, 10:45 AM
Ban DVD's, or short of that create a national registry and require a background check to buy one. For the children.

dbm
08-06-2015, 11:13 AM
I can't comment on the UK laws because I haven't seen them, but this sort of thing generally backfires eventually, either by creating a market for pirated stuff or methods to circumvent the DRM/copy protection, or by consumers eventually bringing pressure to bear when the silliness of it eventually finds a case that embodies it ("Mom sentenced to 99 years for copying Scooby-Doo DVDs so her kids wouldn't keep destroying the paid-for originals," et al).

We have a noble tradition of ignoring laws we think are silly here in the UK. People were ripping their music to iTunes before the law was changed to make it legal, and they still will now it is illegal again.

Generally any prosecution has to meet a 'public interest' threshold. The Crown Prosecution Service wouldn't go for a regular Joe who has ripped their own stuff and isn't downloading or putting things out for anyone to take. They would only prosecute someone who is a blatant abuser of format shifting.

vansmith
08-06-2015, 11:43 AM
Ban DVD's, or short of that create a national registry and require a background check to buy one. For the children.It's all part of the Ministry of Truth's plan. ;)


We have a noble tradition of ignoring laws we think are silly here in the UK. People were ripping their music to iTunes before the law was changed to make it legal, and they still will now it is illegal again.This is the problem with laws such as this - people aren't really doing a company any damage if the copying isn't for the purposes of dissemination. If I made 10 copies of a movie at home but don't broadcast it/disseminate it, am I really doing any damage?

chas_m
08-06-2015, 10:03 PM
Yes, you are doing damage -- to the value of your own time, because you are wasting it. :)