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oxband
06-29-2015, 11:02 AM
I know computer monitors are not supposed to be accurate enough to do proper color correction. What types of monitors are needed to be able to do professional level color correction from home? I dont know what technical specs might be needed.

cradom
06-29-2015, 01:32 PM
Expensive ones: Graphics - VG Series (http://www.viewsonic.com/us/monitors/graphics-vg-series.html)
Or get a color calibration device for the monitor you have. http://www.amazon.com/Datacolor-Spyder4Express-S4X100-Display-Calibration/dp/B006TF3746

Dysfunction
06-30-2015, 06:49 PM
A color managed one. Just because your monitor is color managed, does not guarantee accurate representation.. on anything OTHER than that monitor.

GregR
06-30-2015, 07:47 PM
Brand-wise, take a look at the Eizo CG series and the NEC PA series. Some models come with a colorimeter for calibration, otherwise you'll need to buy that too. It's an expensive affair. Aside from the hardware, make an effort to learn about color management - it's a simple concept, but can be difficult to implement between multiple devices.

oxband
07-02-2015, 09:33 AM
I'm basically on the prosumer end and I didn't realize how expensive proper, professional monitors are.

Given my needs, am I best off buying the color calibrator and using it on my monitors?

For monitors, I use my MBP retina screen and this guy: Amazon.com: Samsung SyncMaster 920NW 19-inch LCD Monitor: Computers & Accessories (http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-SyncMaster-920NW-19-inch-Monitor/dp/B000OSA39Q)

cradom
07-02-2015, 11:37 AM
Just get yourself a Spyder or some other calibration tool and go to town. It's not perfect but it'll be consistent.
https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=monitor%20calibration%20tool
And if you haven't already, might want to learn about ICC profiles.

GregR
07-02-2015, 09:02 PM
I'm basically on the prosumer end and I didn't realize how expensive proper, professional monitors are.



Given my needs, am I best off buying the color calibrator and using it on my monitors?



For monitors, I use my MBP retina screen and this guy: Amazon.com: Samsung SyncMaster 920NW 19-inch LCD Monitor: Computers & Accessories (http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-SyncMaster-920NW-19-inch-Monitor/dp/B000OSA39Q)


Yes, a colorimeter is a good start. Spyder and Xrite are both respected names. The only real disadvantage of a non-pro monitor (if calibrated correctly) is that it will have a smaller gamut than a pro monitor; ie, it won't be able to display some of the colors in your image.

Here's a good starting point: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/color-management1.htm

oxband
07-06-2015, 04:41 PM
Is there any practical different between the Spyder and Xrite?

Exodist
07-13-2015, 05:51 AM
I know computer monitors are not supposed to be accurate enough to do proper color correction. What types of monitors are needed to be able to do professional level color correction from home? I dont know what technical specs might be needed.

Rule of thumb is none of them a re accurate out of the box. Some are close, some are a joke. Buy a monitor that is guaranteed at least 100% of sRGB color gamut. Then spend money on something like the Color Monkey calibrater. Keep in mind just because the monitor can display accurate color, doesn't mean the computer is sending the correct information. Then after all that, you need your printer calibrated into the mix also..

I have the BenQ 32" BL3200 display on my mac.

Dysfunction
07-18-2015, 01:20 AM
Rule of thumb is none of them a re accurate out of the box. Some are close, some are a joke. Buy a monitor that is guaranteed at least 100% of sRGB color gamut. Then spend money on something like the Color Monkey calibrater. Keep in mind just because the monitor can display accurate color, doesn't mean the computer is sending the correct information. Then after all that, you need your printer calibrated into the mix also..

I have the BenQ 32" BL3200 display on my mac.

Also, even if you do fully color manage YOUR system.. that's just your system. So if your intended audience is viewing the image on their monitors, my advice is to skip it and use a non-managed (standard) profile. You'll have a better chance of getting something close to what you really want them to see (I've cringed when I've seen images, color corrected on my calibrated NEC PA monitor, with matching prints, on a non-calibrated monitor.. )

Unfortunately, it's not a simple issue.

chas_m
07-18-2015, 02:57 AM
If you're going to print and not screens, then the advice about ICC profiles to help get the results you want from your printer are important as well. With print, there's another challenge in that screens emit light, whereas paper reflects light -- and of course that means perceptions of colour vary.

oxband
07-18-2015, 11:23 AM
Dysfunction, so in your opinion getting a calibrator isnt really worth the 100 bucks?

techiesteve
07-18-2015, 04:54 PM
Dysfunction, so in your opinion getting a calibrator isnt really worth the 100 bucks?

In my opinion it is worth while, but it will only increase the colour accuracy of part of your work flow. If you can't afford a professional standard display, a reasonable option is a decent IPS panel display. Dell make a few reasonable ones.

When you speak of "professional level color correction from home?" is this for photography or design for print? Is it for yourself or a client? Will you then be printing the images? Knowing the answers to these questions will help us help you.

Dysfunction
07-20-2015, 03:46 PM
Dysfunction, so in your opinion getting a calibrator isnt really worth the 100 bucks?

No, I'm not saying that at all. I'm saying the value will depend on what the image is presented on.


Print: Yes, absolutely.. color manage including printers ICC profiles
Screen that you control: Yes, absolutely.
Screen for random web viewer: Meh, you can pretty much count on the fact that no one else actually manages their monitors, so I don't bother for website presentation.