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tacsniper
03-12-2008, 06:18 PM
Should a person disobey to law if he believes the law is unjust? Why?

lifeafter2am
03-12-2008, 06:20 PM
All depends if you are willing to pay the consequences. It doesn't matter what a person thinks, it matters what the judge and the other authority figures will think.

It makes me think of a quote my friend came up with though: "The only laws that apply while driving are the laws of physics. Everything else is a government suggestion, and I don't take to kindly to government suggestions." -- Shawn

I agree with that quote, and I agree to pay the consequences if I get caught "breaking the law".

WolfsBane
03-12-2008, 07:22 PM
Its called Civil Disobedience. Many books have been written on the subject over the years, in this country and throughout the world. The sad truth is that law and justice is not evenly and equally applied in this country of ours, and confidence in our system of laws is at an all time low.

louishen
03-12-2008, 07:23 PM
I would break the law if I though a law went against fundamental rights and democracy. For example, if a law was passed banning opposition parties, I would deliberately join a party and demonstrate against any judiciary or state that passed that law.

Likewise, if you think a tax is wrong you should not pay the said tax if your beliefs are strong enough (it happened in England with the Poll Tax years ago). Its also the main reason why the founding fathers of the United States decided to throw off British rule.

iRye
03-12-2008, 09:58 PM
If we all had to wear those fruit hats made out of grapes and bananas, then yes I would. (thanks Sarah Silverman)

Waterpolo820
03-12-2008, 10:16 PM
If it is for the better, than yea i would, . But if it was just to tick off someone and put peoples' lives in danger than no way.

This isn't really breaking the law, but I knew someone that sat in front of an Army tank so it couldn't pass, because long ago at my School the Army would bring tanks and etc. to try and recruit kids. She sat in front of the tank and people started joining her, i think she got arrested for disturbing the peace, (it started to get pretty out of hand from what I'm told, she was trowing stuff like eggs at the tank and the personal on the tank.) but I'm not sure, I know she got suspended for a day for ditching class.

Brown Study
03-12-2008, 10:55 PM
Civil disobience brings changes. Obvious ones include women gaining the right to vote and Eliot Spitzer losing everything.

lifeafter2am
03-12-2008, 11:06 PM
Wow, I like this forums! A lot of intelligent people on here with very intelligent answers! :)

Kash
03-12-2008, 11:21 PM
Civil Disobedience for a just cause is good, but you have to be willing to suffer the consequences as the punishment goes hand in hand with breaking the law, regardless of your motives for doing so.

Leukeh
03-13-2008, 08:29 AM
I think I would. I just can't think of any unjust laws at the moment I could break.

leecho7
03-13-2008, 09:44 AM
A good friend of mine was racially profiled. He was walking home from work around 10PM (He literally lives about a block away from his work). The cops arrested him cause they were looking for a "black male between 18-35 years old".
He was eventually let go, but he had to stay in jail for about 3 days before the cops were able to identify the real suspect.
That really got us upset, and there was a time where we thought about breaking the law out of spite.
But we were chill people, so we didn't do it.
If I were there at the time of his arrest though, I would have protested and intervened even if it meant me going to jail.

Village Idiot
03-13-2008, 09:53 AM
they were looking for a "black male between 18-35 years old".


Quick! He's over there! No! Over there! Wait! How did he get behind us!

We really need an eye rolling sarcasm smilie :Angry:

Derek McNelly
03-13-2008, 02:19 PM
Very simple answer to this question:

Yes.

If a law works against the common good, then by all means, it deserves to be broken.

In a less selfish society, laws would be obsoleted, because people would want to work for the common good.

Sadly, most of the world is so "me, me, me" that we'll never see that.

giulio
03-13-2008, 03:09 PM
A question answered without one spoken. Just drive someplace. You'll probably break three laws before you get there.

eric
03-13-2008, 03:56 PM
giulio, i was just going to say something like that...

everyone who speeds raise your hands!

Derek McNelly
03-13-2008, 04:00 PM
*raises hand*

Well, technically, since I'm in the Detroit area, those speed limit signs are pretty much the minimum. ;)

PowerBookG4
03-13-2008, 04:12 PM
A question answered without one spoken. Just drive someplace. You'll probably break three laws before you get there.

so true.

mathogre
03-13-2008, 04:20 PM
Likewise, if you think a tax is wrong you should not pay the said tax if your beliefs are strong enough (it happened in England with the Poll Tax years ago). Its also the main reason why the founding fathers of the United States decided to throw off British rule.
If only that spirit were strong here today... ^_^

Should a person disobey to law if he believes the law is unjust? Why?
On one hand, I think a person must do what's right, regardless of the law. On the other hand, that's not a call for anarchy. I'll accept some levels of injustice as long as I think the rights of everyone are generally being protected.

Common law (regarding the protection of person and property) I consider to be generally inviolable, but "generally" is the operative word. If I thought it proper, I'd break it.

Statute law (made on the caprice of politicians and bureaucrats) is absolutely subject to my disobedience. I won't let the law turn me into a sheep. At the same time I don't care to needlessly become a martyr. If I break the law, it darned well better be for a good reason.

There's always a cost associated with breaking the law and with not breaking the law. What you're willing to pay establishes the kind of person you are.

Brown Study
03-14-2008, 02:45 AM
Americans should march on Washington, after all the marchers, in a brazen but brave act of civil disobedience, stuff ice-cream cones in their back pockets (http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/9283/silly_crazy_us_laws_from_the_past.html). And to show they mean business, they should sprinkle salt on the nearest set of tracks! That'll learn 'em.

Kash
03-14-2008, 02:49 AM
Don't be silly Brown, that would only work in Alabama ;P