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Thread: New Blog: Mail, Thunderbird, and other email clients

  1. #1

    MF Blog Bot's Avatar
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    Thumbs up New Blog: Mail, Thunderbird, and other email clients
    Mail, Thunderbird, and other email clients

    For some time now, the amount of junk mail clogging up my inbox has been ruinous, both in time and missed important communications. There are many methods and tricks for cutting down the junk mail load — the most extreme being setting up a new email address and closing down… Read More
    The post Mail, Thunderbird, and other email clients appeared first on Mac-Forums Blog.


    Read more at the Mac-Forums Blog

  2. #2

    chscag's Avatar
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    I haven't been impressed with Thunderbird as an email client, however, don't overlook the fact that the app is also an excellent news reader for sites that employ NNTP type discussion forums. Many modern BBS operators still have discussion forums on their boards - FIDO forums are still popular as an example.

  3. #3

    Rod Sprague's Avatar
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    It has been my experience that if you use your primary email address as ID to subscribe to web sites, be they reputable or not, then your details will be passed on to the mailing lists of affiliated web sites and companies. No matter what email client you use you mailbox will, over time, be filled up with unwanted "junk" emails from sites you've never heard of.
    Google's web mail site is the best I have seen for filtering mail into classification tabs, Primary, Social, Promotions, Updates and Forums but I have yet to see an email client capable of doing this.
    So no matter what filtering settings you have or might try nothing actually beats having a dedicated email address just for subscriptions. Even if you go to a site from a link in a personal email you can still subscribe using your dedicated subscription address.
    Just go through the junk you have now, unsubscribe and they will slowly disappear over time.
    I used to be conceited but now I'm perfect.

  4. #4

    pigoo3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sprague View Post
    Just go through the junk you have now, unsubscribe and they will slowly disappear over time.
    I wish it were this easy Rod. But many spammers/scammers use the "unsubscribe" ability to detect activity on the user end. With true spammers…if someone uses the "unsubscribe" feature to try to unsubscribe from the junk/spam emails…this action informs the spammer that there is a live person on the other end…and the spam will certainly keep coming…and may even increase!

    Of course unsubscribe usually does work for legit websites. But with the spammers…the problem is the junk email may increase…and I mean BIG TIME. Somehow my gmail account got into some spammers hands…and now I'm getting 50-70 spam emails/day on that account. This happened almost overnight…which is why I think that it may be the same spammer.

    Not sure exactly how this happened. Could have been as you described above (a legit website passing on my info to mailing lists)…or maybe I tried unsubscribing from some emails…and maybe one of the them was really a spammer. All I can do now is ignore & delete all these spam emails as best as possible…and hopefully my inactivity will eventually get me off the list (I don't even open the emails).

    By the way…there is one other "trick" that emailers use to get feedback on the emails they send. It's called a "Feedback Loop". Give this a read for more info:

    https://blog.returnpath.com/what-is-a-feedback-loop/

    But basically it is a way legitimate or illegitimate emailers can get feedback on the email they send.

    It's really really hard to eliminate spam!!!

    - Nick
    - Too many "beachballs", read this: Beachballs
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  5. #5
    Penton Media
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    So far, I've been relatively happy with Thunderbird. One important note: you don't want to have Mail and Thunderbird open at the same time. They tend to conflict with each other and either duplicate messages or disappear them. Leaning Thunderbird's filtering system is taking a bit of time.

  6. #6


    Member Since
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    When you point your browser here (or any site where you log in) and log in, you create a 'cookie' that gets stored on the client computer. Pieces of information about you are stored inside of the cookie, and the site can ask your browser for it when you come back as a way of validating that it's you.

    If the site uses older style cookie handling, they may store a cookie on your computer that contains your email address. Less-than-reputable sites on the Internet, especially those that do a TON of advertising, will try and retrieve any cookies from your browser that they can in an attempt to understand how to send you SPAM. Sometimes it works and you end up with a ton of junk in your inbox that wasn't there before.

    I use Gmail for my mail accounts, and I keep separate accounts for different kinds of things. I also make HEAVY use of Gmail's filters to sort mail into folders so that I'm not bombarded constantly on my phone with "new mail from:" messages. Their SPAM handling is better that Hotmail or Yahoo! by a mile, but sometimes it fails to catch certain messages. Gmail offers no Feedback Loops, and items in the SPAM folder are prevented from loading content not directly included in the message (this is another way they validate your identity - when you open the message, it loads content from their web site using a URL that's specific to the message they sent you).

    Some things that I do to manage SPAM:

    - If I suspect for one hot second that a message is SPAM because of the sender or subject, I mark it SPAM without opening it. I will then switch to the SPAM folder and open it to see if maybe I was wrong.
    - If I can get unwanted junk to regularly filter to the SPAM folder after marking a couple of messages as SPAM, I will leave it for a little while. If it just keeps coming, I'll try the Unsubscribe. Can't hurt... They aren't giving up anyway.
    - Heavy use of filters to keep me from opening messages that I really shouldn't be. It isn't quite "whitelisting", but it's a step in that direction.
    - If there's any question about the possible integrity of a web site, I use a browser that I normally don't run and completely clear out the cache and content / history of every time I use it.

  7. #7


    Member Since
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    Many thanks for this. I shall follow your advice from now on. Also, I have noticed that Gmail has started telling me that they cannot verify the senders of a lot of my mail. At the same time, I seem to be getting a lot more junk mail. Are these two related, do you think?

  8. #8
    Use Gmail. Gmail has the best Spam protection I have ever used and it's simple and free. A gmail account allows you to forward all your email addresses (including domain email addresses) through your gmail account. And if an email that isn't spam goes to spam then click the Not Spam button and gmail will learn to not Spam it next time. (Same goes for spam that goes in your Inbox.)

  9. #9


    Member Since
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    Eliminating spam
    Quote Originally Posted by pigoo3 View Post
    I wish it were this easy Rod.

    By the way…there is one other "trick" that emailers use to get feedback on the emails they send. It's called a "Feedback Loop". Give this a read for more info:

    https://blog.returnpath.com/what-is-a-feedback-loop/

    But basically it is a way legitimate or illegitimate emailers can get feedback on the email they send.

    It's really really hard to eliminate spam!!!

    - Nick
    I'm with Rod. With a little organization and some extra gmail addresses, gmail does a great job at keeping my spam to near zero. I have probably ten active email addresses. Each one has a purpose. If I doubt the sanity behind subscribing to a particular site but still want to do it anyway, I create an email address for that site. I have one wise and grizzled Catch-all email address. I can count on it to deliver me nothing but fluff. But: If I'm giving out an email address for a new business relationship where email correspondence is critical (banks, card processors, utility companies, mortgage companies...) then I create an email address for that relationship. Adding a new account to an email client is easy as pie. I don't need them all on my phone, but I have 5 or 6 on there I'm sure. I might see 20 new emails in my box in a given time period, but a quick glance at the "mail" sidebar tells me exactly what I need to examine first. If a particular site (like Microsoft Windows) makes it too difficult to unsubscribe, then I can simply delete the address from my account list. Let them email me till the cows come home. I'll never know. And if a particular site irritates me, I can always access the email through gmail on the web, where google makes it easy to mark a sender as "spam", and that's that. It might not be perfect, but it IS pretty easy. Maybe it's time for retiring your cluttered email address then CAREFULLY reconnecting a new one to the ones who matter.
    Hope this helps!

  10. #10


    Member Since
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    Quote Originally Posted by magentawave View Post
    Use Gmail. Gmail has the best Spam protection I have ever used and it's simple and free. A gmail account allows you to forward all your email addresses (including domain email addresses) through your gmail account. And if an email that isn't spam goes to spam then click the Not Spam button and gmail will learn to not Spam it next time. (Same goes for spam that goes in your Inbox.)
    While I agree that Gmail has the best anti-SPAM system of any of the mail providers that I've used, the system is NOT always quick to learn when you flag something as either SPAM (that is junk) or NOT SPAM (that was accidentally flagged as junk). Getting it to treat something as junk often takes a couple of iterations while getting to understand that something is NOT junk sometimes takes a LOT of tries.

    One of the things that I like about Gmail's system is that you can flag a reasonably legit mailing as SPAM and Gmail will ask if you want to Unsubscribe or just mark it as junk.

  11. #11

    Collin Bl's Avatar
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    My @mac address has been 'out there' for over 10 years and of course is being on sold to spammers in general.

    Came up with this system a few years ago to easily sort thru incoming.

    First set up a rule in Mail/Preferences/Junk/Advanced

    If all following are met;
    Sender is not in my contacts
    Sender is not in my previous recipients

    Move Message to Trash

    The effect of that is a number of unread in my Trash - today it is 140 - and i have a sticky note on desktop with yesterdays total so i know if new ones have arrived, so i just need to have a glimpse at some stage in case there is a new one i should check out out.

    The second part of my strategy is to have a number of mailboxes on my Mac with oft used/important emails ( i have a rule to move all my internet bills etc. to a Comms Mailbox which means an unread in that folder is a bill to pay fairly shortly but i don't have to read it until i am ready.

    All the Health related items, which build quickly, 3 or 4 feeds, i go thru that folder when i have a spare hour or so on the weekend.

    Not totally foolproof but with the right folders it gives much more control.

    rules.jpg

  12. #12

    Collin Bl's Avatar
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    Meant to mention - have trash set to empty after a week so those unread progressively disappear unopened and no effort on my part.

  13. #13

    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    The very best way to deal with spam?

    SpamSieve (the best $30 you will ever have spent on your computer)
    http://c-command.com/spamsieve/

    SpamSieve is adaptive. You tell it what you consider to be spam and what isn't. Train it for a week or two (extremely easy to do), and from then on you mostly just forget about it. All of your spam automatically goes into the Spam folder, where you can check it for the very rare false positive, or just delete it wholesale.

    If a spam message slips through into your InBox, no problem, just quickly designate it as spam and SpamSieve will never make that mistake with that sort of spam again. If a non-spam message somehow gets into your Spam box, just quickly designate it as non-spam and SpamSieve will never make that mistake again.

    In a short time you will find that you almost never have to do any additional training.

    You never miss an e-mail message from anyone, for any reason. The program works almost like magic.

    Right now SpamSieve reports that I'm receiving an average of 65 spam messages a day, that 24% of the e-mail that I've received since installing it years ago (in 2009) has been spam, and that it's current accuracy is 99.8%.

    Review:
    http://www.macworld.com/article/1141...amsieve27.html
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance • http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  14. #14

    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    Apple's Mail program is by far the most popular e-mail program for the Macintosh. I personally really like Apple's Mail. However, for those who don't, there are a number of fairly new e-mail programs on the market that have attempted to change the common e-mail paradigm. They have each developed a very devoted following:


    Popular alternatives to Apple's Mail:

    AirMail ($10)
    http://airmailapp.info/
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/airm...375?ls=1&mt=12
    Review:
    http://9to5mac.com/2013/12/18/review...to-apple-mail/
    AirMail will connect to an Exchange server!

    MailMate ($50)
    (IMAP only)
    http://freron.com/
    Review:
    http://www.macdrifter.com/2013/11/ma...lorations.html

    Postbox ($15)
    http://www.postbox-inc.com/
    Review:
    http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/09/09...-email-client/

    Mail Pilot ($20)
    (IMAP only)
    http://www.mindsense.co/mailpilot/
    Review:
    http://www.macworld.com/article/2094...ductivity.html

    Inky (free/$5 per month)
    http://inky.com/
    Review:
    http://techcrunch.com/2012/12/27/ink...eal-this-time/

    Unibox ($20)
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/unibox/id702816521
    https://www.uniboxapp.com/
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance • http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

  15. #15

    Randy B. Singer's Avatar
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    I should note that, if you only check out one of the above e-mail programs, it should probably be Postbox. Postbox is the most popular of these Apple Mail alternatives.
    Randy B. Singer
    Co-author of The Macintosh Bible (4th, 5th, and 6th editions)
    Mac OS X Routine Maintenance • http://www.macattorney.com/ts.html

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