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  1. #1
    Has anyone dealt with this???

    Member Since
    May 26, 2008
    Posts
    37
    Specs:
    15" MBP 2.16GHz, 1GB RAM, 120GB HD
    Has anyone dealt with this???
    Honestly, I am ready to sell my MBP right now. I was working earlier today and I started feeling a funny fuzzy sensation under my palms on my MBP. For some reason, instinct had me pull the power cord off right away. This fixed the problem at the time.

    I have read that if you use the power adapter without the grounded cord, this can happen. WTF. So now I have the grounded cord plugged in and haven't felt that sensation anymore but it still freaked me out. Anyone experience this? Can this fuzzy sensation of what I am assuming is (current) hurt you?

  2. #2
    Has anyone dealt with this???
    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    45,282
    Specs:
    27" iMac i5, 3.2 GHz, iPad 3, iPhone 5c, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, Yosemite
    There have been several posts in this forum describing the very same thing. You can do a search and read them.

    The metal body of the MBP might conduct if there's something wrong with your AC mains grounding. That can happen either from faulty wiring or because an ungrounded plug or extension was used.

    Your question about the current hurting you depends.... Depends on how much current goes through you and the resistance of your body. (Hands wet, sweat, etc.)

    Anyway, always use the grounded cord to a grounded AC outlet.

    Regards.

  3. #3
    Has anyone dealt with this???
    Dysfunction's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 17, 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    6,821
    Specs:
    Way... way too many specs to list.
    the voltage, and more importantly amperage, the power brick puts out is really minimal, so unless there's additionally a fault with the brick there's an extremely low chance of damage. But yes, use properly grounded outlet.
    mike
    This machine kills fascists
    Got # ? phear the command line!

  4. #4
    Has anyone dealt with this???

    Member Since
    May 26, 2008
    Posts
    37
    Specs:
    15" MBP 2.16GHz, 1GB RAM, 120GB HD
    Quote Originally Posted by chscag View Post
    Your question about the current hurting you depends.... Depends on how much current goes through you and the resistance of your body. (Hands wet, sweat, etc.)
    I mean it was a fuzzy sensation. I didn't feel like shocked or zapped. Could the fuzzy sensation still have hurt me?

  5. #5
    Has anyone dealt with this???
    chscag's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    45,282
    Specs:
    27" iMac i5, 3.2 GHz, iPad 3, iPhone 5c, iPhone 6+, 3 iPods, Yosemite
    No, not likely. The "fuzzy feeling" was probably caused by a very small amount of current. My main job for many years in the computer business was doing repairs on main frames and later, on mini machines. I've been jolted a number of times - none of them felt very good! But lucky for me each time the amount of current going through my body was not lethal.

    BTW, every time I was shocked was because I was careless. So be careful and always use that grounded plug and extension that came with your MBP when you're not on battery.

    Regards.

  6. #6
    Has anyone dealt with this???

    Member Since
    May 26, 2008
    Posts
    37
    Specs:
    15" MBP 2.16GHz, 1GB RAM, 120GB HD
    So as long as I didn't feel any kind of jolt or pain, I should be in the clear?

  7. #7
    Has anyone dealt with this???
    NPuter's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 15, 2007
    Location
    Miami, Fl
    Posts
    989
    Specs:
    15" 2.2GHz Santa Rosa Macbook Pro - 4GB Ram - 120GB HD OS X Leopard - Windows XP
    Quote Originally Posted by rothko View Post
    So as long as I didn't feel any kind of jolt or pain, I should be in the clear?
    Yes, you're fine

    It will probably never happen again...

    "The forums are not only a place to have questions answered, they are a place to be part of a community..."

  8. #8
    Has anyone dealt with this???

    Member Since
    Jan 31, 2008
    Posts
    195
    I've read a number of posts in this forum about people receiving electrical shocks from their notebooks. This really concerns me because there is definitely a safety hazard with this charger.

    The charger "brick" is supposed to be insulated internally, completely isolating the input side from the output side. So there should be no "sneak" connection from the AC power receptacle to the notebook case no matter how the charger is plugged in. Granted, plugging the charger into a polarized, grounded receptacle will "cure" the problem because the notebook's metal case will then be grounded through the charger to the ground in the receptacle. However, the mere fact that it is possible for a user to be shocked when the charger is plugged in indicates that: 1) The charger has developed an internal fault (short circuit) between the output and the input, which applies a high AC voltage to the notebook's case or 2) the charger has a serious design flaw.

    I'm registered professional electrical engineer, so I do know what I'm talking about. Have your charger tested by a qualified electrician. If you experience any electrical shock, replace the charger immediately.
    iMac G3
    600 MHz
    OS 10.3.9

  9. #9
    Has anyone dealt with this???

    Member Since
    May 27, 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    275
    Specs:
    MBP 2.5ghz, 4gb/r, 200g7.2krpm
    Yes your fine. Electricity won't hurt you, unless its enough to burn you or stop your heart. lol
    -Zach, A.C.T.

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